220V outlet "blown"?

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I have an Amana dryer on a 220V 3-prong receptacle. I was turning the timer dial and suddenly there was a pop! and then nothing - there is no power at the dryer - the light doesn't even come on. I checked the fuse box and rthere were no tripped breakers, but just the same I went ahead and flipped them all off and on. Still nothing.
I have a volage sensor that detects voltage in 110V power cords, e.g. the washer cord - I presume it ought to sense it in a 220V cord, but don't really know if it works the same way on 220. If it does, there is no current in the dryer cord - which tells me it should be either the receptacle or the fuse.
Problem is, the fuse box isn't labeled, and I don't know which fuse goes to the dryer. There are 20, 40 (2-20's) and 100 (2-50's) amp (?) fuses in there - is there a standard which would indicate to me it could be attached to the dryer receptacle?
I hate to call an electrician for a simple problem, but 220V scares the crap out of me - I'm barely conversant in 110V!
TIA - Laurie
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I have an Amana dryer on a 220V 3-prong receptacle. I was turning the timer dial and suddenly there was a pop! and then nothing - there is no power at the dryer - the light doesn't even come on. I checked the fuse box and rthere were no tripped breakers, but just the same I went ahead and flipped them all off and on. Still nothing.
I have a volage sensor that detects voltage in 110V power cords, e.g. the washer cord - I presume it ought to sense it in a 220V cord, but don't really know if it works the same way on 220. If it does, there is no current in the dryer cord - which tells me it should be either the receptacle or the fuse.
Problem is, the fuse box isn't labeled, and I don't know which fuse goes to the dryer. There are 20, 40 (2-20's) and 100 (2-50's) amp (?) fuses in there - is there a standard which would indicate to me it could be attached to the dryer receptacle?
I hate to call an electrician for a simple problem, but 220V scares the crap out of me - I'm barely conversant in 110V!
TIA - Laurie
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It is much easier to do when things are working. A dryer is usually 30a. The 20 sounds too small, and the 50 is too big.

breaker you will have to pay an electrician to do it. Then you find out where the power ends; is the breaker bad, the cable, or the outlet.
When all is done, make sure that 50a (assuming it is the dryer) is safe and proper.
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Toller wrote:

Just breakers.

OK - that's good. I think I'd rather have a bad breaker than a bad dryer!

I just bought the house not too long ago - I had a list going of which breakers went where, but I didn't have the dryer id'd - at least I can eliminate some of them.

Yep - guess I will call an electrician. LOL - Meat Plow's advice, albeit a bit terse, is probably right. :-) I JUST broke down and called an electrician to hang a couple ceiling fans here last week after being totally stymied by the wall wiring (turns out it was miswired in the first place which was probably why the one fan burned out in the first place) and had hoped to avoid spending the $$ on another call on its heels. Thanks for the information and explanations!
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 00:27:28 GMT, "Laurie"

Then try the others. A 240V appliance is usually on a dedicated circuit, so you should now have a breaker that doesn't control anything.
It's a good idea to get all the breakers labeled when you can. It can save a lot of work later.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Yikes, don't I know it now! The electrician will have his challenge I think!
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Laurie wrote:

My curious mind would like to hear what the electrician finds and/or corrects if you do call him/her in.
The fact that in your OP you said you heard that "pop" noise while you were turning the dryer dial makes me lean in the direction of thinking something went west inside the dryer.
On the off chance that you didn't get a voltmeter measurement because both of your voltmeter probes didn't touch the female contacts when you tested for voltage at the socket (because perhaps they were too short) you might try this:
Pluc the dryer cord into the socket but leave it about 1/8 inch shy of fully in and then see if you can SAFELY touch the two unbent male plug blades with the voltmeter probes. If you can, and your meter still doesn''t indicate that there's approximately 220 volts then call the electrician. If you do measure 220 volts call an appliance repairman or consider checking the price of a new dryer if yours is more than a few years old.
And fer gosh sakes, please don't get set off by my using the industry standard gender specific terms for plug and socket contacts. <G>
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

He's coming in tomorrow afternoon, and I'm really interested as well!

I would think so too, but it just seems weird that nothing would work (i.e. the light in the dryer) - but a friend at the office suggested I change out the bulb just to make sure I didn't fry the light bulb. Duh - that is kind of a basic thing I should've thought of!! I wish I knew where the pop sound really came from - it all happened a little quickly and I just *knew* it was a Bad Thing.

Great idea! I was able to do that, and there was still no reading whatsoever, so it looks again like the electrician is the right call! Yeah!

ROFL - I spent 25+ years in the computer tech industry and still remember blushing furiously and the raucous laughter that followed the explanation to my oh-so-innocent question as to how you could tell the male end of the cable from the female end...
Hehehe - it was only a few years later I was teaching tech classes and giving definitions of Reliability, Availability and Serviceability in a way that STILL make me blush!
ANYway - I'll let you know what the electrician says tomorrow.
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On Tue, 26 Jun 2007 00:38:41 GMT, "Laurie"

When I was in the 8th grade, there was a girl in our Health and Safety class who just couldn't understand why a boy and a girl couldn't be identical twins.
I guess if you dress them alike and do their hair the same, they do look the same.
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mm wrote:

Key Word: dress! ;-)
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 16:50:35 -0700, Laurie wrote:

Call an electrician before you kill yourself.
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Meat Plow wrote:

Have a problem with women do we? I'm not an idiot, but thanks for your profound advice.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 00:30:07 +0000, Laurie wrote:

I have no problem with women but thanks for that asinine comment and introducing the gender card in this. I would tell anyone that knows as little as you do the same thing about lethal voltages.
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Meat Plow wrote:

I had no intention of playing with the voltage, all I'm trying to do is decide between an electrician and a dryer repair person, and advice rather than your useless comment might have facilitated my ability to deduce the source of the problem. Fortunately others on this board have been a bit more helpful and actually increased my knowledge by sharing theirs.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 01:24:25 +0000, Laurie wrote:

My comment was harsh but correct. You can take advice from all these nice people but I won't tell you anything but to call an electrician. That way I'll sleep at night knowing I didn't tell someone who is "barely conversant in 110V" to try to diagnose a dryer circut that failed after making popping noise.
Don't bother replying, I won't read it.
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For some perverse reasons, just about ALL dryers use the neutral to power the motor that drives and drum and the timer motor. Compared to the two HOT wires, the neutral carries little current.
If your only tool is a hammer, most problems look like nails. Thus, you might want to un-plug the dryer and see whether 2 or the 3 slots are "live."
The next test of the outlet is to connect a lamp (so that there is a small load) between the neutral and one of the "HOTS."
If the outlet has juice, the problem is inside the dryer. If the dryer is more than 7 years old just get a new one. There is a small chance that the neutral connection or one of the other small guage wires in the dryer got loose. It will be quite obvious as the wire will be burned.
If you trust you skills, repair/replace the burned wires, but everything back together and see if it works.
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Laurie wrote:

In simple terms a 240 volt 3-wire circuit consists of two 120 volt circuits with opposite polarity. The L-shaped contact is both the neutral and ground. Measuring from there to each of the hot contacts should show 120 volts, and there should be 240 volts between the hot contacts.
The fuses or breakers for this outlet should somehow be ganged together. If cartridge fuses are used, typically the fuseholder has two fuses. Pull it out and check the fuses with an ohmmeter. Often, dryers are protected with two plug fuses in a separate enclosure with a big on-off lever on the outside.
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Bob wrote:

Great - that makes sense and is helpful. I will check to see what it shows.

I used the term fuse when I should have said breaker - sorry. Toller said it should be a 30a - don't have one of those, just 20's, 2-20's together (is "ganged" the right word?) and then 50's and 2-50's.
I appreciate the help. I was looking for something separate in the garage that might control the dryer circuit, but didn't see anything.
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On Mon, 25 Jun 2007 00:53:42 GMT, "Laurie"

If all the breakers are on, it sounds like the problem is in your dryer. Call an appliance repairman.
You can make sure with a voltage tester first.
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Terry wrote:

When a breaker trips, it is not easy to find it. Usually the breaker handle is sitting in between on and off position. You reset it by turning it of and back to on. I'd find a correct breaker, reset it, and try the dryer again. If breaker trips again, most likely the problem is with the dryer. Calling an electrician of appliance repair tech, you have 50-50 chance being right. Eh=ither one can tell you if the problem belongs to the other. Do you have a multimeter? Good luck.
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