220V dryer sparked on startup (3 wire) What to test?

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When you state "main panel", do you mean the meter-main outside?
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:15:46 -0600, Nightcrawler®

The "main panel" is normally where ground and neutral are bonded. In my house (my last three, really), they're actually bonded at a box under the meter and run to a panel in the basement (attic and front porch in previous houses). I call the panels "mains" but they're not.
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 18:44:21 -0500, krw wrote:

For me, the meter and the hot/hot/neutral feed, and the neutral grounding bar are all at the same set of three boxes connected together.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:02:10 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

Very near to Summit Road. The views are stupendous. But the power is horrendous! :)
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West or East of 17?
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On 11/19/2013 1:11 AM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

The power being horrendus, is worth it for view stupendous We live on a mountain Youth is our fountain And backup is our generatorendus
A tree branch takes out our power When we have wind or even a shower We go throw the transfer switch Try not to drive into the ditch And environmentalists all rally for the flower
The skyline it is all black I'm thinking of moving myself back I can't stand this condition I maintain my position We've got to buy a Generac.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 06:51:35 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Wow. Just wow! That was clever and hilarious! And apropos all the way.
You should sell that to Generac for them to use as their theme song on the web site & in commercials!
Thanks for brightening my day!
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On 11/19/2013 10:34 AM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

the limerick for free. No credit needed.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:18:40 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

East. Past where Summit road isn't Summit Road anymore.
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Out towards Loma Prieta, then. Highland Way?
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 20:35:35 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

Now you're getting too close! :)
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:-)
My X was a volunteer for Loma Prieta Fire and Rescue, Summit Station. I know the area (used to) quite well. I donated one of my vehicles to the fire department for one of their jaws of life demonstrations. It was pretty cool watching it get chopped up.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 22:08:08 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

Yeah, I cut open doors with an air chisel, and cut circles out of windshields to remove (fake) heads which smashed through and even peeled off the roof like opening a can of sardines.
Amazingly, it's not easy to break a rear window or side window, especially if you hit it dead center with a hammer or sledge.
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That is why one aims for the corners. Less flex.
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 20:48:17 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

We were told that, if we were stuck inside the car (say, we ran into a lake or something), that you can't open the doors after the first few seconds, and, the door won't open until something like 30 seconds after the car settles into the mud (and maybe not even then).
So, if the door wouldn't open, then try the windows, but, often they won't open either (due to shorts), so you're only bet is to unhook the seatbelt and smash out the window.
The way, they said, to smash a window, sans tools anyway, is to kick at the BIG side (not the small side).
The big side, of course, is the side where the door opens, but I'm not sure if we kick there just because it's bigger, or, because it might be weaker on the big side.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 00:02:10 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

I understand what you're saying.
The two things that confuse me are: a) Why TWO big boxes? and, b) WHy so big anyway?
What the heck is in there? A huge switch? Lots of circuits? A big heat sink? I guess I could open them up and look. :)
To clarify though, the generac does kick in whenever the power dies. It also runs once a week, to charge the battery. I don't think it powers the house when it does that though. So, somehow, the circuitry must be cut off for the battery charging.
Also, almost the entire house, but, not the entire house is energized when the generac kicks in. Most of the lights and outlets are energized (which means both interior circuit breaker panels are being fed), as are most of the outlets.
But the outside of the house also has panels, which run the pool and well equipment, which I don't think is energized when the power is out.
Come to think of it, the well must be energized? Or we'd run out of water. So, I'm actually not sure what is energized since most things seem to work when the generator kicks in.
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The pool probably is not, but I imagine your well is. Unless you have a large storage tank with accompanying pressure tank and pump. It is odd that there is not a utility fed battery charger, but that "is" an extra expense both in having a second battery charger and the safety interlocks to isolate the two. While charging the generator is only running the battery charger. This is a scheduled event, or there are sensing circuits for battery voltage.
The transfer switches can be a bit large, and I imagine there are other relays for interlocks and who knows what else is inside. Pop the covers and take a look. Turn the main breaker off and see if you can trace the wiring out. There might even be a schematic inside each cover with information about the specific function of each transfer switch. A good installer would leave such information on premise, somewhere.
A powered transfer switch is essentially a large multi-pole relay. There are many different types and their functions and wiring methods differ from one model/concept to another. Get the serial numbers off of your units and look them up. You might even be able to find a manual online. I have never worked with residential transfer switches, nor Generac stand alone units. The transfer switches I have worked with are about the size of (or larger than) the enclosures your switches are in.
Have fun and be careful while poking around.
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Oh, if you turn off the main, make sure to disable the generator, first.
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On Tuesday, November 19, 2013 1:16:00 AM UTC-5, Danny D'Amico wrote:

Normally they run once a week to verify that they are operational, not to charge the battery. The battery is normally charged via the utility AC. Starting a generator just to charge a battery wouldn't be very efficient.
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On 11/19/2013 12:16 AM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

The top 2 breakers feed back through a conduit at the top of the service panel section. This very likely goes to the transfer switches. Two sets of wires then come back into the service panel. One exits out the top right. They are the feeders to subpanels that have backup generator power.
The transfer switch boxes each have a contactor (a large relay) that switches one feeder back and forth between normal power and generator.

Whatever is feed from the 2 top circuit breakers has backup power.

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