220 Volt Plugs

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On 10/31/2013 01:21 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
[snip]

Generators often have locking recepticles, maybe because of the vibration loosening non-locking plugs.
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On 10/31/2013 08:36 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

Yes, different standards and current capacities:
http://www.mikrocontroller.net/attachment/129925/nema-plugs-receptacles.gif
Jon
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On 10/31/2013 11:36 AM, Pavel314 wrote:

years so we bought a replacement. It's essentially the same heater except that the new one is a different color and the plug is a different configuration. The old one has one round pin and two flat blades, with the blades at an angle to each other and above the round pin. The new one also has one round pin and two flat blades but the blades are lined up with each other, so I have to replace the receptacle with one that matches the new plug. Not a major project, just a minor annoyance and expense.

some have an L-shaped blade instead of the round pin, others have four blades in a circular pattern which lock when turned, etc. Is there any practical reason for all these variations?

Some are based on different ampere capacities. In 110 volt plugs, a config like this:
| | O
is 110 / 120 volt, 15 amp.
Plug like this:
- | O
is 20 amps.
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Paul-
It is common to purchase a new appliance without the electric cord. You would specify which connector is required for the cord, and purchase the cord separately. For my dryer, there were two standard versions, "new" and "old" style. To be sure, I made a photo and printed it to show the salesman.
Unless your new water heater has a significantly higher current requirement, it may be easier to change your water heater cord for one with the correct connector, than to change the outlet. You might be able to salvage the cord from your old water heater if it is still in good condition.
Fred
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On 10/31/2013 1:04 PM, Fred McKenzie wrote:

Greenhouse heater, most likely to heat the air. Still, may be possible to use the old cord.
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wrote:

MANY devices have "custom" cords that would be difficult to swap out for something else - and by changing the cord you can violate the CSA or UL certification of the device.
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wrote:

There are two theories on this.
One is that aliens from various planets use different kinds of plugs and so different kinds of sockets are sold.
The other is that hobos can tell from the socket if they are likely to get a handout or get chased away with a gun.
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wrote:

Are you sure the old heater was 240v? The plug you describe is a 30a 120v plug.
The new heater would "work" on 120v but at about 1/4th the output.
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On Thursday, October 31, 2013 3:49:22 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

placement. It's essentially the same heater except that the new one is a di fferent color and the plug is a different configuration. The old one has on e round pin and two flat blades, with the blades at an angle to each other and above the round pin. The new one also has one round pin and two flat bl ades but the blades are lined up with each other, so I have to replace the receptacle with one that matches the new plug. Not a major project, just a minor annoyance and expense.

e instead of the round pin, others have four blades in a circular pattern w hich lock when turned, etc. Is there any practical reason for all these var iations?

Yes, it was a 240v. On the link
http://www.mikrocontroller.net/attachment/129925/nema-plugs-receptacles.gif
the original plug is in row 7, 20R, while the new one is in row 6, 30R. The new heater is rated at 30 amps.
Thanks to all for their comments and links.
Paul
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wrote:

That 7-20R is for 277v, (the L/N of 480v wye).
Again it would work on 240v but at lower power.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If the original was 277V and they connect a 240V rated heater to it, the heater will run at higher power and may overheat.
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wrote:

I was thinking the other way, 277 heater on 240v. It is unlikely anyone would have 277v available anywhere but a heavy industrial complex or large office building.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Greenhouse heater, not necessarily a small greenhouse, could be a big farm with 480/3. If the original heater was a 277 rated unit operated on 277 then installing a 240 rated heater on that circuit would be a problem. If the original heater was a 277 rated unit operated on 240 it would have been running at less than full power and a new 240 rated unit operating on 240 would perform better. The OP needs to figure out what they really have both for power and for the heater.
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wrote:

I guess we need more info from the OP.
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On Friday, November 1, 2013 9:32:38 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The greenhouse is 14' by 12', just a hobby greenhouse for my wife, nothing industrial or commercial. The line is 240v. Both heaters are rated at 30 amp.
Paul
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On 11/03/2013 03:26 PM, Pavel314 wrote:

I thought you said the new heater had a 6-30P plug on it? Heater should be rated at something less than 30A then (I think 24A max, as a heater would be considered a continuous load? Not sure if there are special rules for heaters.)
In any case, if you are certain that the line is 240V and not 277V, verify that the wire used is at least 10AWG, install a 6-30R receptacle for the heater, and change the breaker to a double pole 30A if necessary.
nate
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On 11/01/2013 08:28 PM, Pete C. wrote:

Agreed on both points.

Yes... so we've identified the plug on the new heater (NEMA 6-30P) Or have we? What is the nameplate amp rating on the new heater? 6-15P looks similar to 6-30P but is physically smaller. 6-15P also similar in size and shape as 5-15 (standard household 3-wire plug/recep) or 5-20 (similar 20A plug/recep, with the neutral horizontal instead of vertical) except both current carrying blades are horizontal.
Question is now, what voltage is available at the existing recep, what gauge wire is feeding it, and what is the amp rating of the breaker protecting the circuit? Finding a 277VAC recep on a 240VAC circuit would not be proper, although I am slowly learning to expect things to not always be correct or code compliant.
nate
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On 10/31/2013 03:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

just after I posted I realized that it might in fact be a TT-30 not a 10-50. Definitely needs more investigating. Is the old heater still available for inspection?
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wrote:

Different amperage ratings, for 1.
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Our greenhouse heater wore out after a number of years so we bought a replacement. It's essentially the same heater except that the new one is a different color and the plug is a different configuration. The old one has one round pin and two flat blades, with the blades at an angle to each other and above the round pin. The new one also has one round pin and two flat blades but the blades are lined up with each other, so I have to replace the receptacle with one that matches the new plug. Not a major project, just a minor annoyance and expense.
I've seen other 220 volt plug configurations; some have an L-shaped blade instead of the round pin, others have four blades in a circular pattern which lock when turned, etc. Is there any practical reason for all these variations?
Paul
No Paul there are no reason the only reason that could find that our OSH system is politically oriented like Washington.
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