220 Volt Plugs

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Appliances aren't fixtures. There is no code requirement that an appliance must utilize the full Ampacity of the circuit it's plugged into. An appliance that utilizes from 0-80% of the circuit's Ampacity is perfectly fine.
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wrote:

I guess I should have included 240.5(1) (2) expands on (1)
(1) Supply Cord of Listed Appliance or Luminaire. Where flexible cord or tinsel cord is approved for and used with a specific listed appliance or luminaire, it shall be considered to be protected when applied within the appliance or luminaire listing requirements. For the purposes of this section, a luminaire may be either portable or permanent.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yes? 14ga wire for an A/C that draws less than 15A is perfectly acceptable, even if it's connected to a circuit capable of supplying more than 15A.
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On 11/03/2013 07:42 PM, Pete C. wrote:

For the *cord only* - and cords cannot be used as permanent wiring other than to make connections within e.g. a light fixture box.
nate
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Easy experiment.
Greg
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wrote:

Actually, in the case of a direct short in a lamp socket conected to a 8 foot 18 guage zip cord the breaker WILL trip, and a fuse WILL blow (15 amp). The cord may or may not show evidence of heat. I have had it happen without any visible damage to the cord.
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On Sunday, November 3, 2013 11:51:31 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1
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On 11/3/2013 10:23 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Somehow, I find that totally believable. What happens when I plug a 100 watt lamp (18 gauge wire) into a 20 amp, 12 gauge wire socket?
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On Sunday, November 3, 2013 8:42:53 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

While what you did is a code violation, I agree it's incorrect to say the breaker will never trip and imply it has something to do with the range. What you did is extend a 50A circuit to a receptacle to be used for the AC using 14-2 wire. We all agree that's a code violation. But if the AC became a dead short, the breaker would still trip before anything happened to the wire. The danger is that if the AC has a partial short, or someone plugs in some other load that is 45A, then the wire can overheat and start a fire without the breaker tripping.
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That is right. A dead short on small wire will trip a large capacity breaker and probably not harm the wire at all. The problem is that as current is drawn the smaller gauge wire will heat much faster than the correct size wire. It may take several hours to several weeks or years before the smaller wire heats up enought to catch things on fire, but it is possiable.
Also from what I get he put aluminum and copper under the same screws. They heat and expand at differant rates. A good way to cause major problems.
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On 11/4/2013 10:13 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

You can't prove a thing! ;)
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On 11/03/2013 08:42 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The light turns on?
There's a big difference between a lamp cord, which is not really intended to be protected by the breaker, and permanent house wiring.
Or am I misunderstanding what you did and you made an extension/adapter cord with a range plug on one end and a 6-15R on the other? If the latter that's more of a grey area; sounds like Not a Good Idea but I can't 100% say it's against code. I'd have been tempted to put a little box in line with the cord with one of those single gang fuseholders or something in case the cord got damaged, although that in and of itself would be an OSHA violation were it done in a workplace.
nate
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On Sat, 02 Nov 2013 12:26:54 -0400, Stormin Mormon

OK, so you've proven my point.
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On 11/3/2013 12:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Stirred not shaken. Wired, not plugged.
Bruises the vermouth.
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wrote:

Yeah but a 650 mA cell phone charger won't be protected by the 15 amp breaker either but no one says don't plug your charger into a 15 am outlet.
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wrote:

A charger like that is internally protected as part of it's "class 2" listing.
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On Sun, 03 Nov 2013 22:29:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Assuming the class 2 listing is not simply a stamp on a cheap non-compliant part (which does happen WAY too often)
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On 11/01/2013 11:05 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

The wiring and the receptacle. A 6-15 recep is not tested for or listed for loads higher than 15A (maybe 20A for a safety factor) 50A is definitely pushing it.
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On 11/3/2013 10:07 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

The garden variety 15A duplex receptacle we use is rated 20A for both halves together and for 20A wire through. (It certainly will be used that way when connected to a 20A circuit.)
A 20A receptacle on a 50A circuit is a code violation (210.21-B-3). Should be apparent that doing the same thing bu changing to a 50A plug is also a violation.
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On 10/31/2013 11:21 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Welders operate on a duty cycle, so code allows you to "downgrade" the wire size from the listed amps of the unit, since the unit cannot be run continuously.
The outlet has to be labeled that it is specified for a welder, though, so nobody plugs in a continuous-duty appliance.
Jon
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