220 Volt Plugs

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Our greenhouse heater wore out after a number of years so we bought a repla cement. It's essentially the same heater except that the new one is a diffe rent color and the plug is a different configuration. The old one has one r ound pin and two flat blades, with the blades at an angle to each other and above the round pin. The new one also has one round pin and two flat blade s but the blades are lined up with each other, so I have to replace the rec eptacle with one that matches the new plug. Not a major project, just a min or annoyance and expense.
I've seen other 220 volt plug configurations; some have an L-shaped blade i nstead of the round pin, others have four blades in a circular pattern whic h lock when turned, etc. Is there any practical reason for all these variat ions?
Paul
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wrote:

Maybe this will shed some light on it
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/NEMA_simplified_pins.svg/350px-NEMA_simplified_pins.svg.png
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On 10/31/2013 11:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I could use a little more light to be shed...
Why do they use the text "Welder or Plasma Cutter" above the L6-20 and L6-30 plugs?
Are there no other devices that use a locking 20A or 30A plug?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Tons. They just noted the common uses for some of the configurations.
To the OP, you can't just change the receptacle style randomly, you have to ensure that the circuit is the correct voltage and Ampacity to match the receptacle and also the device you intend to connect. Those different styles exist to prevent people from plugging a 120V device into a 240V circuit, or a 50A device into a 20A circuit or similar.
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On 10/31/2013 02:46 PM, Pete C. wrote:

and it sounds like OP might have a 10-50 recep and a 6-15 plug, don't really want to be plugging a 15 amp or less device into a 50A circuit, unless the device itself has a main fuse or breaker. Important concept is recep amp rating must match the breaker, except in the instance of a 15A 120VAC recep being allowed on a 20A branch circuit.
nate
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wrote:

I'm not following why it's a problem to plug a 15 amp device into a 50 amp circuit, assuming they are both, say 220volts. How is it any different then plugging a cell phone charger into a 15amp 120v circuit?
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I don't see that as a problem either. Maybe in some devices that do not have any internal protection it could. The devices plugged in should have their own fuses/breakers for their own protection. The main breaker is to protect the wiring.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

I'd say load and wiring. 50Amp breaker can't protect 15Amp deivce most likely.
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wrote:

It's not the job of the breaker to protect the load. The job of the breaker is to protect the wiring and outlets (from burning). You don't want 50A passing through a 15A outlet. AFAIK, the only exception to outlets matching the wiring are with 15A outlets on 20A circuits. Even there, 15A outlets are rated for 20A (pass through).
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On 11/1/2013 11:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Actually the breaker does also protect the load. Ask the manufacturer or UL if you put a 50A plug on 15A rated air conditioner and connect it to a 50A circuit.

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Have you seen air conditioners plugged into 50A circuits? I didn't think so.

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On 11/1/2013 8:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yes, actually, I have. I did so, once. No, thinking about it, twice. Would you like to hear the details?
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On Sat, 02 Nov 2013 08:23:07 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I would.
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On 11/2/2013 10:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

out a load of old 220 VAC air conditioners. I asked, and was given them. Hauled a bunch, and stored them behind a friend's house. Find out these don't sell very well. That summer was hot, and humid. A couple of the LDS missionaries were really miserable in the heat. I tapped a wire off their 50 amp range socket, to power the wall AC which I put in the window. Ran a 14-2 WG wire from his range socket, and put the necessary socket on the end of that. Did a similar thing for another friend, who was not LDS. I'm sure it's not to code, but it did make for some more comfortable people. These have long since been taken apart, and you can't prove a thing!
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On 11/2/2013 12:26 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

that the breaker would never trip.
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On 11/03/2013 10:23 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Easier and safer if they already have dedicated circuits for window shakers (common in some older houses; I had one at the window in the hallway upstairs at my last house) is to just replace the 15 or 20A single breaker with a two pole, move the wiring to the new two pole breaker (white "neutral" is now a hot leg, put a ring of tape around each end) and replace the 120VAC recep with the appropriate 240VAC recep. done and done, easy, and like I said, safe (and to code.)
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wrote:

how I wire my 240V power tools (12-2 with the white wire painted red). That's not a very common situation in existing wiring, though.
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woodchucker wrote:

No different than the 18ga zip cord from your table lamp to the 15A receptacle possibly on a 20A circuit - the breaker will never trip. The circuit breaker in the panel is sized to protect the circuit wiring, *not* the appliance that may be plugged into the receptacle.
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On 11/03/2013 03:56 PM, Pete C. wrote:

Right, but the 14/2 would be considered "circuit wiring" and in fact all wiring on a circuit must be the same size.
There's an odd exception for kitchen circuits but I don't know if it applies in this case.
nate
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