220 VAC to 110 recepticle conversion?

I've replaced a wall mounted A/C unit with a new one. The old one had a 220V recepticle (15A). The new uses a 110V 15A. It is possible to replace the actual recepticle itself with the proper 110V model and use only a single pair of wires from the 220 circuit?
Please advise? Thanks
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 23:21:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@financialdatacorp.com (Bob Mariotti) wrote:

I have a similar question. I see adaptors to plug a gas range into an electric range outlet, but nothing for plugging a gas dryer into an electric dryer outlet. Is there a reason for this? Would it work to replace the electric dryer outlet with an electric range one and use the adaptor?
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Alan wrote:

You don't use an adapter. The 240V outlet should be on a dedicated circuit, and the 120V air conditioner outlet you want should also be a dedicated circuit. You just need to rewire both ends. Shut off the breaker. There's probably a black wire and a white wire connected to the 2 sides of the breaker. (the white wire ought to have some black tape or red nail polish on it to mark it hot, but it usually doesn't) Disconnect the white wire and move it to the neutral bar. At the business end, replace the 240V outlet with an appropriate 120V outlet and you're done.
If you don't understand part of this or are uncomfortable with it, hire an electrician.
Bob
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wrote:

Thanks all;
I am reasonable familiar with electrical wiring but I just wanted to make sure. The instructions you all provided were a great help. If I need more clarification I will repost. Thank again.
Bob
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Very worrying; if the OP and Alan have to ask this type of question, they don't understand the difference between 'regular' 15 or 20 amp duplex style outlet wiring normally requiring 115 volt hot, neutral and ground (a three wire circuit) and a dedicated four wire 115 - neutral -115 (i.e. 230 volt) plus ground circuit! Also a dryer circuit, for example, may be 115 + 115 = 230 volt, but MAY NOT have/need or use the neutral.and therefore be two wires plus ground! I've seen utter confusion by one or two people when they've opened up these standard types of circuit/outlets and not understanding basic electrical circuits by finding, say, a white neutral cut off or not used! Use of adapters likely to be completely inappropriate or unsafe? Regardless of everything else make sure, by testing, the grounds are continuous right through to the AC unit or whatever you have plugged in to the modified circuits!. Get help!
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wrote:

I do understand the difference between a 115 V and a 230 V circuit and have never seen a dryer circuit without a neutral. Regardless, adaptors DO exist to allow plugging a 115 V gas range into a 230 V electric range outlet. If a neutral is used in a dryer circuit, I would believe that the same adaptor could work for a dryer except the the prongs are not the same.

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If you have to ask this question, you should probably have an electrician doing it for you. But if you really want to do it yourself: Assuming your 220V outlet is fed with a 2 wire cable (white, black and bare), what you need to do is: go to the electric panel, turn off the double pole breaker feeding the 220V outlet, disconnect the white and black wires from the breakers, connect the white to neutral bus and the black to a 15A breaker that has no wire connected to it, buy one if all are in use (breaker must be off before connecting wire to it), Then replace the 220V outlet with a 110 volts (bare wire to ground, white to the longer vertical slot and black to the shorter slot).
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This is Turtle.
Yes very much so.
You need to be real sure as to the 220 circuit wire that is there is big enough wire for the doubling of the amp on just one hot wire now with a 110 volt window unit it is replacing. If the 220 volt window unit was pulling 10 amps on two legs and then you replace the same btu rated window unit that will be run on 110 Volts service. The amps of the window unit will be double what the 220 volt serice unit would using and the amps will be 20 amps.
Check the wire size verses the amps , breaker , receptical amp rating. If you need help post here with details or e-mail me.
TURTLE
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