20amp GFCI outlet on a 15amp circuit. melted wires

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Not necessarily. Most GFCI receps are rated @ 20A even if they are NEMA 5-15R. (so they can be used on a 20A circuit... like a bathroom.) Someone probably had a recep in the bathroom and decided to replace it with a GFCI to make it closer to conforming to current code. Makes sense to me. Problem is that the ckt. is still 15A and the OP is putting high load on it (which is the reason for the 20A requirement in the first place.) We're just speculating at this point as to why the neutral connection is "melted."
Now if the GFCI is in fact NEMA 5-20R then someone did something that they shouldn't have, although it is still not the source of the problem.
nate

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wrote:

I agree with everything that you say... I was just pointing out that saying that someone installed the wrong GFCI because it's "20 AMP" isn't necessarily a true statement. Most GFCIs w/ NEMA 5-15R receptacle(s) are still rated @ 20A because 5-15Rs are permitted on a 20A circuit and it is often convenient to use a GFCI recep as the first one in a "string" rather than using a GFCI breaker. But if it has a true NEMA 5-20R recep then it was the wrong device but not the cause of the problem.
nate
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I agree with everything that you say... I was just pointing out that saying that someone installed the wrong GFCI because it's "20 AMP" isn't necessarily a true statement.
** When it's installed on a 15 amp circuit, it's a correct statement. When an electrical receptacle is referred to as 15, 20, 30 amp, etc. the reference is being made to the devices configuration, not it's pass through capacity
Most GFCIs w/ NEMA 5-15R receptacle(s) are still rated @ 20A because 5-15Rs are permitted on a 20A circuit and it is often convenient to use a GFCI recep as the first one in a "string" rather than using a GFCI breaker. But if it has a true NEMA 5-20R recep then it was the wrong device but not the cause of the problem.
nate
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You're assuming that the OP is using the same conventions and terminology that you do. I haven't seen yet where he specified. Irrelevant anyway as when was the last time you saw a hair dryer with a 20A plug? nate
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On May 29, 8:21am, "Stormin Mormon"

@Chris:
In general your wire size and breaker capacity logic is correct...
However in longer circuit runs, you see a #12 AWG wire being used on a 15-amp circuit to counter voltage drop over the long run... Ditto with #10 AWG wire being used on a 20-amp circuit for the same reason... So wire size is NOT always directly connected to the amperage capacity of the circuit...
~~ Evan
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Ziggs wrote:

Whatever. You're just dealing with the symptoms. The actual SOLUTION is to get the wife a less-powerful hair dryer.
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