200 amp?

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why?, I did a load calc and 100A is plenty for our house.
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The lighting load of an average house isn't going to mean a hill of beans to your service size

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On Tue, 6 Nov 2007 20:32:59 -0500, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Energy Star appliance efficiency refers to relatively small savings by redesigning the product so that it idles with minimal or no power being drawn when it is not in use. (A modern TV, computer, or a monitor is a good example). A Tivo Recorder will have a disc drive that runs hot whether you are watching a recording or not, on the other hand.
The amount energy star savings per household is very small and has nothing to do with having 200A service capacity or some other arbitrary number of service capacity.
However, if you multiply this small amount of energy savings per household by all the households in your neighborhood, town, state or on a countrywide basis, the savings are substantial and could amount to one or more LESS full scale power plants. This is good for the earth and so they say, what is good for the earth is good for you.
At the most, you will save a few bucks a year using energy star products. If you convert from incandescent to CPF lamps you will probably get some real savings.
Service capacity depends more on climate and square footage than anything else. Homes in extreme cold and hot cliimates need more. Wealthy people also need more (keeping that hot tub at 98F on a 24/7/365 basis, for example) Wealthy people have larger houses, which cost more to heat and cool, keep the lawn watered, etc.
Beachcomber
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snipped-for-privacy@notreal.none (Beachcomber) writes:

Not always small. Our new refrigerator is rated to use *less than half* the energy per year that our old one (less than 20 years old) consumed.
    Dave
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wrote:

Just as a little sanity check, a 60a average use works out to 10,368 kwh a month. At a dime a kwh you would have a thousand buck electric bill. I do understand some people may have some pretty big peak loads but I still think, if you aren't Al Gore 200a is plenty for just about anyone.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Even with large potential loads you rarely run into issues with a "normal" 200A service. I have a 200A service and with electric heat, clothes dryer, oven, welder and the usual lighting loads I could theoretically peak at around 300A if everything were to hit at once, but I've yet to have a problem.
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Hi,
Sort of embarrasing to admit it, but we needed to have two 200 amp panels. Note sure if the supply is 400 amps, probablly not .... don't know... The panels are stuffed full of breakers too. I think I only have maybe six slots open....
Best, Mike.
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wrote:

Did you need them for the amperage or the breaker slots?
Bob
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