20-amp ktichen circuit, 15-amp GFI okay?

I am adding two 20-amp circuits to provide a total of 6 above-the-countertop receptacles. I will be wiring them so that every other receptacle is on a different circuit -- so two sets of 3 receptacles per circuit. And, the first receptacle for each circuit will be a GFI with the remaining two receptacles on each circuit being covered by the GFI at the beginning of that circuit.
My question is, can the two GFI's be 15-amp rated GFI receptacles, or do they have to be 20-amp rated GFI's?
I am thinking that the GFI's and the remaining receptacles can all be 15-amp rated receptacles, but I wanted to check here in case I am wrong about that.
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Two 20 amp circuits is over kill iif you only have enough counter space for 6 outlets mho. But you are correct, you can place multiple 15 amp receps on a 20 amp circuit.
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wrote:

Two 20 amp circuits is over kill iif you only have enough counter space for 6 outlets mho. But you are correct, you can place multiple 15 amp receps on a 20 amp circuit.
A minimum of 2 -20 amp circuits is required by the Nec for kitchen counter outlets
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yes, so it's not really overkill now is it.
I believe that many "15A" GFCIs are actually rated at 20A for the GFCI portion if you read the label, so that would be OK, but read the label.
nate
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On 11/10/2010 4:20 PM, RBM wrote: <snip>

I'm about to wire up my kitchen counter. What I'd like is two pairs of two duplex outlets. That would be a total of 8 outlets in two groups.
Should I:
A) split wire all the duplex outlets.
B) wire each duplex in the same box to a different circuit/phase.
C) wire each double duplex all to the same circuit.
It's an L counter and these outlets will be in each side of the corner. I'll have the MW, toaster oven and coffee maker plugged in, who knows what else. Outlets will be in the wall, a few inches over the backsplash.
Stove on the left, sink to the right, and a duplex outlet on each end of the L.
Does the fridge need to be on a separate circuit?
Jeff

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wrote:

Go with a double gang box and a duplex in each box on each circuit.
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On 11/10/2010 2:49 PM, RogerT wrote:

Personally, I would install 20 amp rated because I own electrical plug-in appliances that draw a lot of current like electric grills and large toaster ovens.
TDD
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The only difference between a 15 amp receptacle and a 20 amp receptacle of a given grade(*) is the face plate, the 20 amp receptacle has the extra slot to accept 20 amp plugs. The innards are the same and are rated for 20 amps pass through.
Cheers, Wayne
(*) 20 amp receptacles may not be available in the cheapest grades, but I only use the better grades that provide back pressure-plate connections.
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On 11/10/2010 5:09 PM, Wayne Whitney wrote:

I certainly wouldn't use 59 cent receptacles. I will often install a 20 amp plug on something that I don't want anyone plugging to a 15 amp receptacle. One of the problems I often come across in commercial settings is a receptacle burning up. An industrial or commercial grade 20 amp receptacle solves the problem. If I have a situation where items are being plugged in and unplugged a lot, I install a hospital grade receptacle.
TDD
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No, it is not. 15/20 Amp breakers are NOT guaranteed to have 20 amp capability in a 15 amp component. Internal wire gages & all connections are usually NOT capable of 20 amps because it's cheaper to make them for 15 amps. Every penny saved is important on a manufacturing line.
In wrote:

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15 amp receptacles are required by UL to handle 20 amps feed through. The UL directory information for RTRT (receptacles) does not make that 100% clear, but UL has provided further detail. See, for example, their response included in this thread (third to last post):
http://forums.mikeholt.com/archive/index.php/t-61043.html
Cheers, Wayne
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wrote:

Also, if 15 amp receptacles didn't have 20 amp pass through, the Nec wouldn't allow them on 20 amp branch circuits
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Thanks everyone for the replies. Looks like what I want to do will work and will meet the code requirements.

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