2-wire in-walll timer -- still sold?

Page 1 of 2  
Both my friend and I have the same problem, a wall switch box with only two wires and a ground entering the switch box. We both had 24-hour timers that worked fine; we both bought replacements to find that they need 3 wires, they need the neutral. There were no insturctions on the outside of the packaging.
Do they still sell timers that need only two wires?
These will NOT use fluroescent lights.
Not counting the ground wire from here on: The new ones have white, black, and red wires. The white goes to the neutral which is usually also white, the black to the hot which is usuallly also black, and the red goes to the load, the light bulb.
But we don't have a neutral wire in the boxes that hold the switch. I havent' seen his but I have one piece of 12-2 Romex. Plainly, the neutral and hot wires went to the ceiling, but only the hot and its return went to the switch.
The original toggle swich just made or broke the connecton beween the two wires. The first and second timers I had did the same thing. Those timersr broke years ago and I know what they looked like, but not the brand, and I haven't found them on the web.
I could maybe put in a neutral if I have to, but the house he rents iisnt't suitable for that.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 13:34, micky wrote:

Intermatic still makes timers that don't require a neutral. Without a neutral the timer relies either on an internal battery or a trickle current through the lamp filament to operate the timer. In the latter case the timer works only with incandescent lamps. Thanks to our legislative nannies such timers will not work in many applications, hence their scarcity in the marketplace.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 4:34 PM, micky wrote:

Here is a link: (Amazon.com product link shortened)00Q9YUGU
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 7:47 PM, RBM wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)00Q9YUGU
What powers the motor in it with no neutral available?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 9:46 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

It doesn't have a motor in it, but it's powered by allowing a trickle of current through the circuit when it's in the off position
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

button battery that operates the timer for a year or two per battery change that will work anywhere a toggle or rocker switch will work - including on 2 wire switched return circuits
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 10:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

"Mechanical" timers running a couple years on a battery?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 11:21 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

I think that their reference to "mechanical" is how you operate the thing. You have to turn the dial and push it in to set it. Their digital models have push buttons and a screen. The timing mechanism is electronic, not mechanical
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/17/2011 7:07 AM, RBM wrote:

I checked the instructions and you are right. Only two wires and a 40watt incandescent minimum load. By the looks of it and the description, it sure looks motorized.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Dec 2011 11:35:35 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No, they exist. I think there are 7-day timers too. In the grey metal box about the size of a thick bible, with a silver-grey lever coming out the side for manual on/oiff. Usually hard-wired
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

is a neutral.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks RBM (and thanks all). This one will be just fine. It's very much like the one I had first.
Plus this pointed me to www.1000bubls.com which includes pdf manuals for this one, and a couple other Intermatic that I looked at.
I'm confused by the ST01. http://www.1000bulbs.com/pdf/Inter-ST01C-Operating.pdf It says:
Resistive (heater) 15 Amp, 120-277 VAC Tungsten (incandescent) 15 Amp @ 120 VAC, 6 Amp @ 208-277 VAC Ballast (fluorescent) 8 Amp @ 120 VAC, 4 Amp @ 208-277 VAC Motors 1 H.P. @ 120 VAC, 2 H.P. @ 240 VAC DC Loads 4 Amp @ 12 VDC, 2 Amp @ 28 VDC
Does "Ballast (fluorescent)" include all fluroescent? Especiallly CFLs?
It uses a battery like you said, so maybe that means it works in anything. From the installation pdf, you can see that it too only uses 2 wires (3 for 3-way.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

keep time and they have multiple on-off switching ability. They can be programmed to switch time for daylight savings, and they can also be programmed to automatically compensate for varying daylight lengths (longer in summer--shorter in winter). A great timer, however they are quite complex to program. You can find them for a reasonable price on Ebay. =======================================================Remove the ZZZ from my E-mail address to send me E-mail.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Dec 2011 10:57:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net (Ron in NY) wrote:

It *sounds* great!! Thanks.

I can handle it, he said proudly, and my friend's landlady is pretty smart, but sometimes gets stubborn and plays dumb. The two of them can work it out.

Thanks again, I often forget to look on ebay.

P&M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I forgot to mention---The ST01C is white and the ST01AC is almond in color. =======================================================Remove the ZZZ from my E-mail address to send me E-mail.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Utter nonsense.
OTOH, if you only talked about things you knew something about you'd be a mute.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Dec 2011 12:05:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks. Maybe this won't confuse me anymore.

Very good to know.
BTW, these are for the ceiling lights, in one case a kitchen and the other case a dining room. Partly to give the houses a lived-in look when no one is home.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I believe there is also a model with a "randomizer" that changes the on-off times by a few minutes to half an hour each cycle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Replying to myself (so as not to get into a fight!) I found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_ballast the fourth and last picture "Electronic ballast of a compact fluorescent lamp" and it shows a CFL that's been opened.
Plus http://www.1000bulbs.com/category/4-pin-plug-in-fluorescent-ballasts / and http://www.1000bulbs.com/category/2-pin-plug-in-fluorescent-ballasts / which seem to be external ballasts, but still are under the heading "Compact Fluorescent Ballasts (CFL)" They really seem more like "compact (fluorescent-ballasts). IOW, I don't know what they are but Ron's first-hand report and the wikip link are enough for me.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

and CFLs have an "electronic ballast" .The derating factor may well be less on electronics, but the "be safe" method is to treat all flourescents as ballasted lamps when calculating switching loads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.