2" Flex drain pipe?


The folks that built my little brick bungalow in the midwest back in '54 didn't screw up everything. Most of it is pretty solid.
The 2 24k certified time bombs I'm aware of involve drain pipes in kitchen and bath that were sealed inside the wall.
The bath hasn't failed quite yet. In the kitchen I've had to tear thru tile and plaster/steel-lath just to find the juncture of a 2" lead drain with a vertical roof-vented cast-iron stack. I'm not even certain how to get the corroded, leaking pipe out, let alone how to get new stuff in, as 2/3 of the length is behind the cabinet/sinktop which can't be moved.
Does there exist 2" flexible drain pipe that meets common bldg. codes for such an application? If so, any description etc would be much appreciated.
TIA, Puddin'
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Puddin' Man wrote:

The only flexible material that comes close is Type L soft copper tubing. You could use 1 1/2" size although I'll be the first to admit Type L does not quite make it code-wise for DWV application.
Snaking it thru a tight wall could be a "challenge".
There are heavy-wall vinyl tubing sizes but anything like that is going to have the appearance of a shoe-maker job :-) Maybe heavy black poly pipe. Pretty stiff though.
Jim
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Puddin' Man wrote:

I have no idea about codes, but the kitchen in my last house was a problem. I replaced the drain with steam hose. It lasted for many years and was still in place when I moved.
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Puddin' Man wrote:

I presume this is an exterior wall? If not, opening the wall from the other side comes to mind. Or can you make access from the basement or a crawl space?
Otherwise, it's probably then a toss-up as to whether a kitchen remodel or a brick-removal/restoration project is the larger hassle... :(
I don't have any other suggestions than those already made as for something else to try a repair-in-place. While there might be, I'm certainly not aware of a code-compliant product.
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Puddin' Man wrote:

Maybe beating a dead horse - Could you drill a hole thru the flooring under the sink (just this side of the finished wall). Drop down to the basement ceiling joist space below and make the run from there.
Connect the new drain to the existing cast iron vent with a couple of 45 EL's to offset into the wall and a Fernco.
Since you will have a 1 1/2" trap, the drain can be 1 1/2" (PVC) since it does have a vent. Jim
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not cetain about 2 inch but flexible schedule 40 is made.......
stumbled on to it when buying some clear schedule 40 pipe for a game
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

plenty. always successful and will last a long time. think about the auto environment and compare it to the soft home conditions. use a stainless steel hose clamp. i use 2 for additional strength.
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Very difficult as I built a spare bedroom under kitchen 20+ years ago. Framed window is right under drain pipe.

Tying into the stack is beyond my plumbing abilities.

Correct.
I had to get a plumber in. He cut the lead near the joint, used a 2"-to-1.5" coupling to get pvc drain in. Lead stuff inside the wall looks damned scary to po' me.
I did as much as I could ... still gotta custom build cover, etc.
Much thanks, P
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While you say the sink and cabinet cannot be moved, it may well be the only way that the plumbing in the wall. It may not be that hard, to pull the cabinet and sink, as you think. Most can be unscrewed and removed. Without doing that you may find that the plumbing job requires more of the wall opened up than you expect in order to do a proper repair.

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Puddin
Sounds as if this is changing into a bigger project than you were expecting.
If you have decided to cover the hole behind the stove you have made, you can make that hole quite large so you can see and work in that area well. You will need a sizeable hole under the sink, but it can be covered the same way. You could make a custom FRP wall face as large as the sink base. This could even be done in the back of the cabinet next to the sink if necessary.
Are the holes in the studs drilled round holes or are they notches in the 2x? Are they 2x4's? Are the holes or notches large enough to accommodate 1 1/2" pvc if the lead pipe was gone?. How about 1 1/2" pvc couplings? How do they have the lead pipe tied into the stack? Is the lead pipe in good shape right where is goes into the stack? What diameter is the vertical stack? How many studs are there between the stack and the waste connection under the sink? Does the house have a gable roof and is this wall on the gable end? This has to do with it's load bearing requirements.
This project can be done, you just need to weigh the possibilities. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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the 2x4's were cut clean thru. Damned if I know why they even bothered to put 'em in there: no support from header to footer.

Lead/oakum.
Fortunately it wasn't chewed up too much. Had it been, I woulda been in BIG trouble. :-)

I had to get a plumber in. He cut the lead near the joint, used a 2"-to-1.5" coupling to get pvc drain in. Lead stuff inside the wall looks damned scary to po' me.
It was the copper part (about 18" long) that rotted.
I did as much as I could ... still gotta custom build cover, etc.
Much thanks to DanG.
Best, Puddin'
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wrote:

P&M
I don't know much about what's available,
but I would try PC-70. Epoxy is usually great, and this is probably the greatest epoxy I've ever seen.
Long ago I was a roommate of a girl whose kitchen sink wouldn't stop dripping, and whose drain was leaking. It didn't seem to bother her or her roommate, I guess because they didn't own the property.
The PC-70 went on while the drain was dripping, and when it hardened, the drain didn't leak anymore. When the stuff was not set yet, and still was falling over, I would push it bakc up again, but that only ltook 15 or 20 minutes after mixing. Then I left it alone. It fully sets at 24 hours. Didn't leak for the remaining 4 months that I lived there. Other things I've glued, or items I have made** with PC-70 have lasted 10 years or more and show no signs of failing now.
**I was missing the cap from a winesack. So I put a light coat of vaseline on the threads, and molded a cap out of PC-70. When it dried, I needed pliers to loosen the "cap", but after that, it screwed on and off like any cap. The whole thing was made out of PC-70.

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Who makes PC-70, or where can one find it?
Al
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