2-cycle oils

I have two lawn machines that are two-cycle. One calls for a 50.1 mix and the other calls for a 40.1 mix.
How important is it to maintain these exact dilutions.
What harm will be caused by using a 50.1 mix in a machine calling for a 40.1 mix, or a 40.1 mix in a machine requiring a 50.1 mix?
Thanks,
Shepherd
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40.1
I think the ratios are "close enough for goverment work" so that it really doesn't make much difference.
What's important though is to use a two cycle oil that's formulated specifically for small *air cooled* engines-- not the stuff rated TC-W3 readily available most anywhere which is designed for watercooled engines like outboard motors on a boat. Water cooled applications are a lot less demanding.
In years past, it didn't use to make much difference- most any 2 cycle oild would do-- but with the newer lawn equipment engines running hotter and leaner, you really should use the stuff formulated for them. And of course, it's much more expensive!
Joe
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The ratio is more a function of oil technology than engine technology. You could use either ratio but my preference would be the 40:1 ratio for both. Use fresh premium fuel and oil from a major manufacturer like Echo, Stihl, or Husquvarna.
I just started using Mobil 1 synthetic MX2P. (Autozone sells it)

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Found my answer right here.. Sorry, I should have spent more time checking the post already posted in this newsgroup.
Shepherd

40.1
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These engines are designed for these mixes. Too little oil and you burn up the engine sooner, too much oil and you would tend to foul plugs, at minimum. Do yourself a favor, two gas cans, mark them and keep the oil mixes per manufacturers spec.
Same with weed trimmers, chain saws, etc. use what the manufacturer recommends.
I have seen some two cycle oil that touts itself to work in all different engines with the same mix, but I don't trust it.
Maury

40.1
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Technology and oils have changed. I'd agree with a 50:1 and a 16:1, but the difference between 40 and 50 is minimal. The new oils allow for a lesser concentration. On my Stihl saw, they give 40:1 for normal oil, but 50:1 for their branded synthetic oil.
I've been using one mix for a few years with no problems. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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I take 2 8oz cans of lawnboy oil and put it in a 5gal gas can, and then fill it up at the pump and work the nozzle all around the can as I am filling it to get a good mix. That way after the mowing season I use it for my snow blower. I also use this gas for my weed whacker, chain saw, and small tiller. I've never had a problem.

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are you saying that anything new needs less oil? why does my lawnboy recomend 32-1 also who makes synthetics.
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I've had no problem for 25 yrs using synthetic 50:1 in a wide variety of 2-strokes, which routinely get worked _hard_. Put simply, more oil than required means more smoke and more deposits in port and muffler. And by all indications, the better 50:1 covers it.
Then you can concentrate on having one gas can with oil mixed in, and one "neat."
HTH, John
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