1920's wiring....

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Everyone I've ever seen used by NYSEG and ConEd are aluminum with a steel core

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bud-- wrote:

Around here #2 aluminum is the smallest you are allowed to use in a home. Usually for the electric range.
TDD
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 11:38:56 -0400, "Existential Angst"

The idea behind it is - if one circuit blows the whole room does not go dark.
I've seen wiring done that has, say, all the outlets on the left wall of all rooms on one circuit. Outlets on the right wall on one circuit, outlets on the back wall on one circuit, and on the door wall on one circuit.
All switched outlets on one circuit, and lights on alternate circuits so no 2 adjacent lights share the same fuse . This was for safety reasons - never have more than a short distance dark at one time from a blown fuse, and for seviceability - which outlet went out? - it's the fuse for that "location".
Not common - and only in more expensive homes, because it took a lot more wire, and work, to install.
I'd put new wires in the wall if possible.

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wrote:

Most wire nuts don't even require pre-twisting of the wires. The soldering is overkill and makes working in the box a pita.

Fein Multimaster to cut the holes, and setting type joint compound to repair them. Quickest way, and you should have the wires in the walls for a number of reasons.
R
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