18 volt battery in 12 volt drill?

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I've run a 14 volt drill with a 12 volt battery....has anyone run an 12 volt dewalt drill with an 18 volt battery....I have two 12 volt drills but would like to use the more powerful batteries. Thanks
Paul
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

That sound you hear is your drill's motor burning up.
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Some tool makers use different contact configurations, so that you can't over volt a drill. 18 volts in a 12V drill is a bit too much. I wouldn't.
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wire their used in the motor. I devised a way to use four batteries for an old two battery screwdriver. Worked wonderfully.
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Right. I've run double and triple the rated voltage on DC drills. I've abused them terribly and almost never burn up a motor because of it. If you check the motor manufacturer's specs you will see that the motors are rated for quite a range of voltages. If you have a source of donor parts or the drill in mind is expendable, then have fun and go for it. Custom made tools are great.
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The motor may handle it but you have electronics and gearing to consider, it seems everyday products get cheaper, so do the internals.
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I doubt that for those voltage (6 to 18 volt) the electronics should not be a problem. The motors and electronics may well be the same for all units from a given manufacturer. And the electronics doesn't amount to much of anything anyway. Not even as involved as variable speed AC motor drives.
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The electronics amount to everything if they blow.
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I just checked a 12 volt typical drill. The "electronics" consistes of a switch and an RFP50N05 (50 Ampere, 50 volt, .022 Ohm, N-Channel Power MOSFET). So it will work with anything up to 50 volts and 50 Amperes.
So if you want to go to a larger battery and are still worried about blowing something open it up and take at look at what is used inside. Wonder where I can get a 40 volt battery to put on it???
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The key is the 50 amp rating. My RC car 7cell - 8.4v needs a 30 amp fuse it blows 20amp. Nicads can dump alot of power. And for a drill you dont want to get near its rating you just shorten its life.
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Rich wrote:

LOL! That's ALL that has to dissipate any power? Whooooo, woooo! Great discovery, Tim!
Now tell me this: what is the maximum core temp rating for any of the windings? Or the commutator max current? These guyys need to go do some research. Badly!
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m Ransley wrote:

You got that right. And since engineers design to limits, it's pretty UNlikely a 12V unit has 18V components. Nine to 12 maybe, but not 18. These guys must be loved by the battery and replacement parts shops, or they use their equipment a few seconds at a time once or twice a year. Then, even IF the components can live thru 18V vice 12, it's a pretty sure thing the motor/stator windings weren't designed to dissipate that much heat. Sooner or later one of these guys will set the drill down after a prolonged session, the core temp will work its way out thru the windings, and drip possibly flaming plastic or winding cement onto the bench, and start a fire with it, and then blame the manufacturer for their house burning down. Way too many people think batteries are "safe" and that they never heat up. The best part is the failure of a 12V while it's on an 18V charger; it's usually a pretty site, at first. When a battery core's max temp is exceeded, it almost always explodes or vents with great gusto, especially the types used in power tools. If you want to see a really pretty site, try a lead-acid on a bigger charger; it's prettier yet, all that carbon to burn off. Watch someone come back and say those batteries can't vent 'cause they have no vents <g>.
Don't drink & drill.
Pop
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Rich wrote:

I bet. I'll also bet you didn't use ballasts to balance the batteries, and their life was awfully short, but then it "worked", right?
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On 1 Feb 2005 07:10:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

They are likely throw aways anyway, so if they fit, have at it. It will NOT likely harm your battery.
This morning, I took one of my 16.8 volt drill batteries apart and found the bad cell and replaced it with a cell from a 9.6 volt battery (which I had trashed because it had a bad cell also). It works wonderfully, even if the battery was smaller in physical size than the 16.8 batteries.
PJ
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I have found the batteries to be too inconvienient to use, regardless of the voltage. So, I went out and bought a new Dewalt and wired it directly to the 120v house current. I also built an adaptor for it so that it runs on 240 for those really tough jobs.
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Matt get a transformer 480v works best.
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Hey! I never thought of that. Will do!!!!!
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Matt wrote:

Folks, Matt and Ransley here just might be dumb enough to plug therir DC drill into the AC socket or an AC transformer, but trust me it will blow your circuit breaker very fast. Sometimes it will blow so fast that the drill will survive it. You can use an AC step down transformer that will put out 10 amps or more, but that's expensive unless you already own one. A DC drill operated in this fashion has no where near the power (watts) of a low cost AC drill with a cord. There are ways to beef up your DC drill. However, don't listen to these fools. They have not done anything themselves.
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WHAT you mean my 3.6v B&D cant take 440 AC so far it works great ! Gee Ive got 3, 220 - 110 transformers from Europe and I was just going to inline one more for 880v AC. Aw I gonna try it anyway an 880v ac B&D Kick ass.
Howabout an 880v coffemaker , makes a pot in 6 seconds flat. And my slow ceiling fan, yep 440 just might do it there also.
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I agree. Folks, don't listen to this 'professor' guy - the only thing he can safely profess is that he is a dipshit. EVERYONE knows that there is no real difference between AC and DC - that whole thing was a conspiracy to defraud the public. Your power tools, coffee makers, TVs , stereos, ALL OF IT - will run longer, faster, and better on 880v +.
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