15 or 20 Amp

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This is Turtle.
Hap Hazard , You do read well do you. You did not read the wire size verses the breaker sixe write up did you ? Go two post back up and read it again. You need to get out more often and see them Electric wires more. Also take some reading lessons for that would not hurt at all.
TURTLE
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David DeBoer wrote:

If this is to be a dedicated circuit, and if I had to buy the wire, I would go with 15A circuit and #14 wire. Fourteen gauge wire is a little cheaper, and a lot easier to work with, and a 15A circuit should be more than adequate. If I had #12 wire already, I would run a 20A circuit, just because.
Best regards, Bob
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There is no such thing as too much power. You don't NEED more than 15 amps, but go with 20A and 12guage wire, anyway.
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Yes, 20 amp circuit. My computer / printer / monitor power strip is on a 15 amp line and the overhead light blinks when the laser printer goes through it's warm up cycle. I'm using a backup supply for the computer to keep voltage constant. I'm thinking of adding a second backup supply with 7 amps in which will deliver more current out for a limited time. Eventually, I'll get around to putting in a 20 amp line. If you have the choice now, don't put in a 15.
Bob

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Most computers are fairly low load. 15 oughta do it. Yes, there are restrictions hwo much load you can put on a panel. 15 amp breakers take 14 AWG wire.
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David:
DD> I would like to put my computer equipment on its own circuit. Would I need DD> a 15 or 20 amp breaker to do this? Are there any restrictions as far as ho DD> many breakers can be in the box? I know there is room for more. What gaug DD> wiring would this require? I'd go with the 20 Amp circuit "just because" it's a little more robust in case you need more current later. Maybe it's a little cool in the Computer Room and you need to take the chill out by running an electric heater.
And for your next question, no, you do not have to use 20A rated outlets on a 20 Amp circuit - the 15 Amp duplex outlets are fine.
BTW, speaking of outlets, you might want to have a few more than one or two per wall for the equipment. Also plan ahead to position the outlets where you need them now and where you may need them int he future should you re-arrange things. Easier and cheaper to plan ahead for the future now.
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Check your local building code. Up here in Ontario, you _must_ use 20A rated outlets if you have a 20A breaker.
Hmmm... Hold on... I've said that a few times but now that I think about it, the part of the code I'm thinking was dealing with a kitchen countertop where you ether had to have a split-circuit recepticle or a single 20A circuit (complete with 20A outlet). It's possible that it's not required to have a 20A outlet on a 20A circuit in other situations. But why take the chance? It doesn't make good sense to use a 15A rated part in one place when the your only piece of protection (the breaker) is rated at 20A. Plus, if you ever had a 20A piece of equipment, at least you'd have a recepticle that would take it.
Brian ( snipped-for-privacy@precidia.com )
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Maybe so in Canada, but in the USA we are certainly allowed to install 15 amp outlets on 20 amp circuits. In fact, you can install as many on a circuit as you wish. Homebuilders do it all the time. In fact, we get our electrical jollies doing it.

Again, maybe in Canada, not in USA. There are 20 amp wiring requirements for kitchens, but no requirement for a 20 amp outlet. Last time I checked, my toaster, blender, coffe maker, electric skillet, and anything else I am likely to plug in my kitchen doesn't have the kind of plug that requires a 20 amp outlet.
It's possible that it's not required

In mainstream house wiring it's really not required anywhere, with the possible exception for a dedicated circuit for something like an air compressor or other high draw device. Again, that's NEC. Things up there may be different.
But why take the chance?
What chance? There is absolutely NO DANGER IN PUTTING 15 AMP OUTLETS ON 20 AMP WIRING. NONE, NADA, ZILCH. Keep in mind that a 15 amp outlet won't allow anything to be plugged into it that will draw over 15 amps. For that very reason, it is not allowed to put a 20 amp outlet on a 15 amp circuit. This is where you could potentially plug something in that would over draw the wiring.
It doesn't make good sense to use a 15A rated part in one place when the your only piece of protection (the breaker) is rated at 20A.
You clearly don't understand the concept. Let me repeat myself. A 15 amp outlet will not allow anything to be plugged into it that would allow the wiring, outlet, and breaker. Power is drawn from the load, not pushed from the supply. A 15 amp outlet is fine on a 20 amp circuit. The outlet wont melt, explode, or anything, because nothing that will draw too much current will be plugged into it. Get it yet?
Plus, if you ever had a 20A piece of equipment, at least you'd have a recepticle that would take it.

the special plug configuration that requires a 20 amp outlet. I'm not even sure what type of appliance, tool, or widget this would be.
By the way, your other post was really amusing. Where did you get that 240 amp kitchen code requirement?

And you'd be taking ABSOLUTELY NO CHANCES by doing this. All you'd be doing is what home builders do all over the place. I'm not even sure what kind of appliance even has the plug configuration that requires a 20 amp outlet. What makes no sense is spending a pile of money on 20 amp outlets when you don't need them.
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As somebody pointed out, even "15A" recepticles are rated for 20A feed- through. That's what is important. They're not not configured/rated for 20A appliances.

I know. I didn't understand why a 20A outlet was necessary either, but it's "code" and if I wanted to pass my inspection...

And those devices should have 20A plugs if they're going to draw a 20A surge.

Yes, there IS A DANGER _if_ at outlet were only rated for 15A. However, since a 15A outlet is still rated to handle 20A of current (though not to a single device), then you're still okay.
We're in violent agreement here. <grin>

Note that what you say here is technically wrong. NO simple outlet protects against things being plugged in to it. I could easily add a power bar or string Christmas lights together and try to draw more than 15A from a single socket. It may make things more difficult (for example not allowing a 20A plug to fit) but _all_ protection comes from the CB in the panel, not the outlet (at least, not a standard simple one).
But, since a 15A outlet is actually rated for 20A current it's fine to use on a 20A circuit. I did not know this when I made my original post.

I do. Do you?

Mostly shop equipment; a lathe for example might require 20A.

- every appliance has to have it's own 15A circuit:     dishwasher, garbage disposal, fridge, microwave        60A - countertop: split circuit or 20A, every 6 feet, adjacent must be on different circuits, next to sink must be GFI:     1 x 15A@240V-split, 2 x 20A (GFI outlets)        70A @ 120V - stove/oven: 40A (required present even if using gas)     oven doesn't draw that much, cooktop is gas        40A @ 240V - lights: must be on separate circuit     one circuit for all lights                15A - smoke / explosive gas detector     separate circuit if running 3-wire "ring all" config    15A                              ===========                             240A @ 120V
The panel in the basement is 100A @ 240V. You can see the history of the renovation here: http://pobox.com/~bcwhite/beaumaris/kitchen/ It _is_ actually finished now... I just haven't finished the write-up.
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It occurred to me later that this is incorrect. Power _is_ pushed from the supply (with a force of approximately 120V). It's how well the load resists this push that determines how much current it will pass. Open air resists it very well; copper wire does not.
Voltage is a potential energy, much like (to use a frequent analogy) a lake at the top of a waterfall. As it falls, the potential is converted to heat, motion, whatever by the mechanisim through which the current passes.
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