13 amps

On what basis do you suppose thye rate this at 13 amps, instead of the usual 15 amps for 14 gauge? The length? 100 feet
http://www.lowes.com/pd_59610-66906-UTP511735_0__?productId191693&cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-Electrical-_-ExtensionCordsSurgeProtectors-_-3191693&CAWELAID49148737&kpid191693&CAGPSPN=pla
Their 12 gauge gets rated at 15 amps.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_67439-16503-UTP511830_0__?productId203689&cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-Electrical-_-ExtensionCordsSurgeProtectors-_-3203689&CAWELAID24204305&kpid203689&CAGPSPN=pla
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This is probably just someone who wasn't paying attention Down in the description it says "Rated 15A/125V/1875W, designed for use by contractors and industrial personnel "

It has a NEMA 5-15 plug on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/19/2014 10:00 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

products used in China .... or .... maybe someone is actually thinking about what happens when you put resistance in line with stuff. Or, I'm probably overthinking this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014 10:00:05 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Maybe.
Assuming these are valid U/L listings, that SJxx cord is rated for 300 volts (the "J" meaning 300v)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nema 5-15, right??? A 100 ft #14 cord would generally NOT be rated at 15 amps due to the resistance of the long cord.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014 18:09:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The issue is a 5-15 is a max of 15a and the question was about a 12ga cord.

That affects voltage drop but it is not an overload on the cord itself. There is no enforceable code about voltage drop, just a "gee whiz" informational note.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014 20:42:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

ga 100 foot cord is too high - makes for problems running a 14 amp contractors saw, or starting an air compressor. Talking about code, even a 15 amp plug on a #8 or #10 cable would meet code
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014 22:43:26 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The biggest piece of equipment you can have rated for a 15a plug is 12a.
210.23(A) (1) Cord-and-Plug-Connected Equipment Not Fastened in Place. The rating of any one cord-and-plug-connected utilization equipment not fastened in place shall not exceed 80 percent of the branch-circuit ampere rating.
12a at 100' on a 14 would drop 7.4v. your saw would still run OK if the line voltage is not low to start with. Around here it cruises around 124 so I would not even give 7v a thought.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 May 2014 23:50:32 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the supply is not "stiff" it will draw high current for too long, tripping the breaker or blowing the fuse. My old Beaver saw would blow a fuse on a 50 foot #14 cord, and start perfectly plugged in directly or on the #12.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 May 2014 00:17:19 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The number 12 will drop 4.6v at 15a. I doubt 3 volts will make that much difference and those universal motors they use on most power tools deal with low voltage a whole lot better than a regular induction motor. They just run a little slower. You generally start the saw (drill or whatever) unloaded anyway. Is 12ga better? sure. Would a homeowner ever notice the difference? Probably not. They use 16ga cords with skil saws all the time. I have too. To the experienced ear, I can hear the difference when I am in some tough wood but it works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 May 2014 00:45:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Contractors saws do NOT use universal motors. Mine was a repulsion start induction motor and as I said, on a long cord it would trip a breaker or blow even a time delay fuse. On a heavy cord or directly plugged in, it was NEVER an issue. Note - a "contractor's saw" is NOT a hand tool. It is basically a portable table saw. 10 inch blade. Same with my compressor - but I switched it over to 220 so the problem dissapeared.

1/4 inch Milwaukee is 13 amps and my Rockwell is 12..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 May 2014 12:41:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I guess that is why they sell 10 gauge cords.
Most people who shop at Home Depot would never notice the difference.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.