125v vs. 117v revisited

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Took some time this evening and checked the voltage on several outlets in my shop and to my surprise I found several at 117v and several at 125v. Then I noticed that the difference voltages were on different circuits. Then taking a look at the breaker box I noticed that each 125v would be directly across from another 125v breaker and the same for the 117v circuits.
Well, that gave me a good clue as to what was happening so I opened the box and took a look and checked some voltages. I took a picture, added the voltages to it, and uploaded it to one of my domains at http://www.dongares.com/breaker.html so go and take a look.
As I have previously mentioned in an earlier post this is a sub-panel which is supplied from the main panel in my home via a 100 amp breaker. I have not taken time to check but I am almost willing to bet that I find different voltages in my home also. It is going to be interesting to see if what I am getting from the street to my home is also different voltages...how you want to bet?
The home was built in 1993 and these differences have never caused a problem but it will still be interesting to see what is actually happening.
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wrote:

You have a poor neutral connection somewhere. Guaranteed. One leg is higher than the other, which means there is more load on one side than the other and your neutral is floating to some extent. Check at the main breaker at the house, from each line in turn to both neutral and ground. If you have the same difference there, call the power company or an electrician to check the problem. (or if you feel qualified, check the torque on all the neutral connections in your service box first - if still off, call the power co) If the house circuits are good and the shop is not, check the neutral wire for the shop circuit, both at the main panel and at the shop sub-panel. There is no other explanation than a bad neutral somewhere. It might not be in your house - it could be anywhere between your house and the transformer. Check with your next door nieghbor to see if they have the same situation - then you know if it is "local" to your house, or more system wide.
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On 12/28/2015 1:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What happens if it's a bad center tap or load imbalannce?
I suggest if your guarantee fails, you need to discuss with IGP what will be your pentalty. Perhaps donate $100 to Salvation Army in the name of IGP.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 07:13:01 -0500, Stormin Mormon

The "poor neutral connection" MAY be in the transformer - but it's still the neutral. If it's in the transformer the transformer needs to be replaced to solve the problem because it is either a bad connection or a burned winding.. It is almost definitely NOT an error in the initial winding of the transformer.
My guarantee is a 100% money back guarantee. He didn't pay anything for my opinion. He gets exactly that back if I'm wrong.
And if he proves I am wrong, He will also get my appology.
More than he'd get from many others.
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wrote:

I say you're getting 8 volts for free and you shouldn't complain.
If you really can't use them, you might even be able to sell these 8 volts. It's a shame you didn't post before Xmas because that's when people are spending money, but you probably only lost 20% or so.
If you're in a hurry, or don't want strangers coming to your home, contact an electricity wholesaler.
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Yep, one "LEG" is higher than the other.

So why didn't you just go in the house and open the panel, and measure the voltages on the MAINS. It would have only taken a few more minutes to pop off that cover and measure it. [Before you posted this]. At least then we would know for sure that your MAINS (directly from the meter) are not balanced.

All electrical stuff is rated for 120 volts, but few homes have exactly 120. Most are somewhere between 115 to 125. All regular appliances and bulbs will work just fine on any voltage in this range. If you get below 110 or above 130, there will be problems. (and 110 and 130 are already pushing the limits).
I have 118 on both legs at the moment...
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On Monday, December 28, 2015 at 5:07:59 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

+1
Many posters suggested it could be a problem with either a loose neutral on his side or the power company's side. Simple way to find out if it's his side is to check at the incoming service at the main panel.
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wrote:

Do the same thing at the house panel, then get back to us.
We can play "spot the violations" later ;-)
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The grounds in a sub-panel are not to be terminated on the neutral bar. Remove the green screw and install a separate ground bar in your sub-panel for the grounding conductors.
Did you contact the power company? A problem with one of their lines may be causing the voltage drop.
John Grabowski http://www.MrElectrician.TV
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 07:44:15 -0800 (PST), John G

Is that all you saw ;-)
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 11:04:33 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

He doesn't have a voltage "drop" he has a voltage "imballance". His service voltage is pretty well dead on where it should be at a total of 117+125$2 volts. Only 1% over spec.
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 11:48:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The voltage drop is in the neutral
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 09:11:44 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster
You are trying to tell us that a PoCo had over a mile of "secondary" wiring. I don't think so. The transformer that takes the medium voltage distribution down to the service voltage is usually within a hundred feet of the service point. The 120/240 or 120/208 will come from that transformer bundle if it isn't coming from a customer owned SDS. I would agree that a problem in their primary could cause bad voltages but all of them would be bad in the same direction (GIGO)
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wrote:

He didn't say that. Perhaps a mile away was their autotransformer.
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2015 11:14:54 -0800, "taxed and spent"

We were talking about imbalances in a 120/240. That happens in the final transformer in the distribution. Everything on the line side of that will be medium voltage in residential, typically a single phase and in commercial that will come from the utility right outside or a customer owned SDS on site.
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wrote:

A secondary network may be formed with many transformers feeding into a common bus at the utilization voltage. So, a problem a bit distant from the home can cause a problem.
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On Tue, 29 Dec 2015 05:09:37 -0800, "taxed and spent"

Where do they do that? We have something that might look like that when it first meets the eye. This is the middle transformer, of 3, in what looks like a continuous bus that serves 11 houses but if you look carefully, that dog bone on the 2 ungrounded conductors is an insulator so that "bus" is actually 3 separate segments on 3 transformers.
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/transformer.jpg
It happens when there were 2 customers, fairly far apart served from one transformer and then the houses start filling in.
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No, it's not. It's time he calls an electrician to fix his bad neutral connection.
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On Wed, 30 Dec 2015 13:29:29 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

If he has everthing on the one leg the neutral wire is carrying ALL the load. If he splits the load equally the neutral carries no load - so yes, balancing th load may get rid of the voltage inbalance, but he still has a problem. MIGHT just be undersized wire for the load and distance - combined with no ground - but I'm atill thinking neatral problem. (and undersized neutral COULD cause the problem if the load is unballanced)
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There are incompetents in every field. So what? He still has a neutral problem, he still doesn't understand that, he still doesn't know how to find it, and he still needs to call someone who can.
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