110v line to 220v line?

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WConner posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

didn't do ANY research get good answers then argue with them and will do it the way you want. Go away.
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My definition of "modest shop work", is a few power tools for home projects. Even at that, you're still probably going to be tripping a 20 amp breaker. If you need several pieces of 230volt equipment, then do it right.

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wrote:

If you keep it at 110, he'll be even more modest!

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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No problem just mark the white wire with black tape and wrap the ground with white, any idiot knows whats going on including the inspector.

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properly; not to mention legally. But, if you put all the 120v stuff on GFCI outlets, I can't see it is particularly dangerous. The GFCI would prevent ground loops; so the major problem would be that the neutral is a potential shock hazzard, but I have legal (well in 1982 when the were installed) "uninsulated neutrals" and they haven't caused any problems. But of course, my cables say "uninsulated neutral" all over them, so no one working on them would be surprised; yours wouldn't.
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I would recommend running the new wire for two reasons -Larger Gauge will keep voltage steadier and less likely to heat up and cause more problems while running alot of tools -Saftey first... Uninsulated neutral is just one step away from an uncomfortable experience with AC current. Its worth the extra cost and effort in the long run...!
snipped-for-privacy@living-automated.com http://www.LivingAutomated.com
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not permitted. after you call the local where is my underground utility company to mark stuff, think about trenching and include some water, sewer for a sink, phone, internet, cable. maybe upgrade to that subpanel you want. see wiring faq at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 /
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You forgot zoned heat piping and an underground tunnel so he never has to go outside. LOL

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wrote:

Multiple violations of the National Electrical Code here. Code does not permit the use of an uninsulated neutral. The separate ground wire doesn't meet Code either, as it fails the requirement that all conductors on a given circuit must be in the same cable or conduit. Do it right: run a new, proper 220V circuit using 10-3 WG direct-burial cable.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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With two hots and one neutral, you'd be possible to overheat the neutral in a big way.
Probably the original wire wasn't a clad ground, so it's not totally sure to be clean and not corroded thrugh.
Sounds like more trouble than it's worth. I'd suggest like the other say, to run a new wire. I can't remember if it's UF, or what they call it. But there is wire th at is designed to be burried. I like the other fellow's suggestio to go with 10 gage. Greater capacity, lower line loss.
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overheat it unless you are overheating one of the hot wires in normal operation.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Well that is true if they are properly wired to opposite phases, but from what we have seen of the OP I fear it is a 50:50 chance of him getting it right.
I think Storm has it right.
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Not if they're connected properly.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

But is the OP who appears to not give much credit to code, even know there is more than one way they may be connected?
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Joseph Meehan

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Well, supposing I'm running a space heater (15 amps) on the black wire and the bare wire. And running a hair dryer (14 amps) on the white wire and the bare wire. That's 29amps in a bare piece of 12 ga.
How would you wire it differently?
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

If the space heater is on one phase and the hair dryer is on the other phase that neutral (bare or otherwise) is carrying one amp. Of course that means it is live and can produce injury and can be shorted out to ground. Which is why you can use the same size wire and why it should never be treated as a ground wire.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Sounds like Stormy fell asleep in Basic Electricity 101 or even junior high Science class...
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Actually he's right on this one. This fails code on two points.
You can't have a ground act as a current carrying wire.
You can't run two circuits off one neutral. You used to but it hasn't met code in some time.
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wrote:

Go look at your wires coiming into the house. Your whole house runs on one neutral and it is smaller than either phase..
If he drove a ground rod at the second building connected to the grounded conductor and installed a 2 pole disconnect the real issue would boil down to the bare neutral.
It's wrong but it is far from the most dangerous thing in the world.
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