110V from 220

Can I steel 110 volts from the 220 volt supply to my oven/range for a range hood and possibly an over the range microwave later? Thanks for any help.
Dave Miller
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No, the range is probably a 50 amp circuit and the hood and microwave would be 15 and 20 amp circuits, which would be protected only by the 50 amp breaker. Also you would overload the circuit in using all appliances together. The hood can be wired to any lighting circuit and the microwave needs a dedicated circuit

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range
Can you? Yes, if there is a neutral in the box. Should you? NO! Look up previous threads about 110 from 220, for a better explanation of why not. If it is just a fan, you can probably steal power from the ceiling light in the kitchen, if it has unswitched power in the box, or from a counter outlet, or outlet in the room behind, if this is an inside wall. If a micro is in the plans, bite the bullet and string a dedicated circuit, running to an outlet mounted in the cabinet.
aem sends...
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wrote:

Odds are your feed to your oven/range is sized for their demand; so don't mess with it.
Just a side note, many microwaves are very powerful, and come with many features. Example, if you have a 1.8kw microwave, just to cook food it will be drawing 15 amps at 120v. (1800w = 15a x 120v). So with do-dads I wouldn't besurprised it's rated amperage is higher. So the microwave, in this case, will probly need a dedicated 20 amp circuit.
Remember, only use qualifed people for electriclal work, and a consultation shouldn't cost you much.
imho,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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You have three problems which will impact resale value, if not be outright dangerous. 1) Unless the house it reasonably new, your oven circuit will not have a neutral and should not be used for 120v. Yes, your stove probably is partly 120v (as is mine), but you don't want to add to that problem. 2) The circuit is probably the right size for the oven, and is not intended to be added on to. Yes, unless you are using both the oven and several burners you ought to be okay, but it is still a bad idea to push your luck with electricity. 3) The 50a breaker will not protect your add ons, which will only be rated for 20a. You would have to put in load center with a 20a breaker. It is probably cheaper just to add a new 20a circuit for the microwave.
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There have been several refferances as to the breaker not protecting the device hooked to it. The braker is only to protect the wires . It is not to protect what is hooked to it. The device should have its own protection built in.
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Well, you normally plug a microwave into a 5-20, which would be a code violation on a 50a breaker. I suppose you could use something larger, but it would be foolish. And I didn't say it was a code violation, I said it was dangerous. You want to plug your microwave into a 50a circuit, go ahead. (though it might be a code violation; modifying devices with UL ratings...)
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

So, if I plug a lamp into an outlet and the lamp socket, cord, etc shorts out, the breaker isn't there to protect against that? Where's the protection in the lamp? Or how about a washing machine or dishwasher, where the wiring inside shorts to the metal case? Those are going to trip the breaker before the appliance goes up in smoke.
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rated

is
Many household items are plugged into breakers much bigger than the current they need. Look at the clocks. They use almost no current (less than 1 amp) and are plugged into a 15 amp breaker circuit. They will smoke way before the breaker trips. There are very few items in the house that are connected to a breaker that is anywhere near their rated current.
The main purpose of the breaker is to protect the wiring going to the recepticals. If you plug in a lamp and the cord shorts, hopefully there will be enough current drawn to trip the braker. There have been things like TV sets that develop internal problems that will cause the TV to overheat and cause a fire without drawing enough current to trip a breaker. The TV should have an internal fuse or braker set for just about what it needs. Most are plugged into a 15 amp outlet but do not use anywhere near that ammount. Without any internal protection, they could develop problems and the breaker would never trip.
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says...

It's best to estimate the repairs, take it off the sale price of the house, and do the repairs yourself. The exiting homeowners have no interest in doing the fix beyond what may be barely acceptable.
I'd either estimate completing the repair and take it off the price, or just let it go and complete or redo the repair yourself. Over the course of homeownership, this is a nit.
But don't have the exiting homeowners do the repairs. This is what you get.
Banty
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On Sun, 07 May 2006 15:27:37 GMT, "Ralph Mowery"

This is controlled by the minimum size and maximum length of a "fixture wire". In a fault condition a short piece of 18ga wire will pass enough current to operate a 20a breaker. If the OP is still fixed on the idea of "stealing" power from the stove he should add some kind of supplimental protection (fuse or breaker) where he takes the power off the 50a circuit. It is still not a recomended plan.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

While perhaps true, I think that misses the point.
What size wire are you going to use to connect the new outlet for the microwave to the existing range outlet?
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Dave Miller wrote:

Hi, Even tho it is possible, it's agaianst code.
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Dave, after reading all the replies, it's clear that part of the problem is in how you asked the question: "Can I steal 110 volts..." You can do any damn thing you want. If you want to know if it will work, it will. If you want to know if it meets NEC rules, it doesn't. If you want to know if it's safe, it's not

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only if you have a gas stove and the outlet is not in use might you look at that particular cable for a different use, while standing next to a licensed electrician who will explain why you might leave the unused outlet for the next guy who wants an electric stove. whether for gas or electric stove, he will advise you how he can add the proper sized and protected outlets for the new devices, all subject to your local requirements. general electrical faq at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 /
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