110V and water

Page 2 of 2  


It may or may not trip the breaker. Water is not a very good conductor and small ammounts can just cause a small current flow. It may even heat up the water. Had a water heater that the element cracked and was causing the water to heat up way too much. That was casude by some of the current bypassing the thermostat and directly heating the water. Still did not trip the breaker.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

et...
That's also how some of the vaporizers that they sell in the drug stores to use when you have a cold work. They heat the water by just using 2 electrodes near each other submerged in a plastic tank of water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3.net...
You only need to add salt if the water is low in minerals. Most tap waters work fine. I've had various vaporizers of that type and never had to add salt. In the directions, they talk about adding a small amount of salt if it doesn't work without it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 Mar 2009 08:24:48 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

>
When the kids were little we used one. My wife HATES deposit build-up in kettles etc, so it was run on distilled water - and it worked.
Better than salt is a bit of washing soda or Borax.(if you need to add anything)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And there was still some scale buildup, wasn't there? It's the electro-chemical reactions. Now let's sit back and watch the egos take off on that.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 18 Mar 2009 10:26:30 -0400, "Twayne"

Actually with the distilled water, deposits were ALMOST non-existant.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 Mar 2009 07:58:33 -0700 (PDT), Pat

>
NO they do not require salt, and Chalescraft, for one, distictly cautions AGAINST adding salt. Apparently there is a chlorine danger when NaCl is added to the water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have kids. And I also know how mistaken you are if you think only kids can use such devices.
Adding salt to the water is not necessary and is specifically prohibited for warranty purpose of any such device we've ever had.
The work fine without adding anything to the regular drinking water.
Considering this thread was started by a troll and taken on by a buncho of egotists with nothing worthwhile to do, every single person so far has missed the actual reason WHY they work as they do. No one has mentioned the material used in the posts of these things, and althoug it was obliquely referenced, no one pointed out that current flow will depend on the distance between the two probes in the water and the surface area of the probes at first. Once the process gets started, it's self sustaining as long as any water is still touching both probes. Me, I'm done with this thread; my only reason for reading it was to see who the dummies might be. It's quicker than long lurks.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

el3.net...
I diidn't see any problem with the thread and no one else seems upset. Also, what makes you think that no one else here knows that the current flow will depend on the surface area of the probes. Oh, BTW genius, the current doesn't just depend on the surface area initially, it depends on the surface area all the time.
Don't let the door hit you on the way out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[snip]

cite?
--
charles

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*You reminded me of a commercial kitchen that I serviced many years ago. One time the manager complained that it was taking a long time for the coffee urn to heat the water. No problem with the temperature, but it took a few hours to get hot. I knew that there was a 2000 watt element in the urn so it should have heated up faster. I took the unit apart and found that the element had practically disintegrated. The water was being heated by the current flowing through it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.