10 cheapest BEST cities to live.... and to run a mfr'g bidniss??

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Allen Drake wrote:

I wouldn't say exactly that. The budget deficit in 2007 was $110 billion. The budget deficit for the year ending Sept 30th was $1.4 trillion. For the entire eight years of the Bush administration, the combined budget deficits were about $800 billion. Obama has quadrupled that amount in only three years.
Assuming Obama inherited a mess, he's made it worse. Far worse. Almost impossibly worse.
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HeyBub wrote:

You are assuming the federal budget deficit is a problem.
The federal budget is not causing the economic slow down. The fedreal budget deficit is the only thing preventing a full scale depression bigger than the depresion of the 30's.
It is private sector mismanagement of credit and debt that has been pushing the US into a depression. The federal deficit is the only thing preventing the depression from happening.
This is not theory. This is what you will see as fact when the effort is made to reduce the deficit. Economic collapse.
The fact that 15% of workers cannot find suitable employment tells you the federal deficit is now way too small.
When Congress makes the deficit smaller then millions more in the US will become out of work. If Congress tries to balance the budget there may be 50% of the workforce unemployed.
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jim" <"sjedgingN0Sp wrote:

Well, that's the story and the administration is sticking to it.

Inasmuch as the federal payroll has increased 40% since 2007, a rise in the number of drones might not be so bad. It would leave some room for the worker bees to thrive.
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Total number of employees on the federal payroll is pretty much unchanged :
http://www.bls.gov/webapps/legacy/cesbtab1.htm
Jan 2007 '29,000
Sep 2011(20,000
So I assume you are claiming that average earnings by Federal employees has increased by 40% when from what I gather, for the past several years wages have increased by at most a few percent and more recently they have been frozen altogether.
Put another way, where did you get your 40% figure ?
(Cites please)...
SEE:
http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/94-971_20100120.pdf
2007= 4.5% 2008= 2.3% 2009= 0.9% 2010= 3.4% 2011= not shown, pretty sure they were frozen.

A decline in the amount of unsubstantiated information that's constantly parroted about the economic situation would be better IMO
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Grumpy wrote:

In the future, when using the word "bandwidth" in a newsgroup post, please abbreviate the word as "bndwdth" thereby saving precious bndwdth.
Thnk u
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Grumpy wrote:

Do you have a suggestion?
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wrote:

Actually,the "progessives" are the ones who have ruined America. The more socialism they enacted and implemented,the worse America became. You can see it in the "education" field the best. Kids "graduating" are dumber than they've ever been.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On 10/16/2011 10:06 AM, Jim Yanik wrote:

But they've learned to be politically correct and have high self esteem as demonstrated by receiving trophies for just trying. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2011 20:01:10 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Hell, Obama got a Nobel Prize for not having the last name of "Bush". Talkign about elevated self-esteem!
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On 10/16/2011 10:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Our Affirmative Action President received an Affirmative Action award. ^_^
http://preview.tinyurl.com/3hlojgp
TDD
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Jim Yanik wrote:

lacey

http://www.fair.org/index.php?page 50
With much of southern Iraq in the hands of coalition forces by the weekend after the opening of hostilities, reporters naturally started asking where the weapons were: "Bush administration officials were peppered yesterday with questions about why allied forces in Iraq have not found any of the chemical or biological weapons that were President Bush's central justification for forcibly disarming Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's government," the Washington Post reported (3/23/03).
Miraculously, the answer seemed to come that Sunday night (3/23/03), when military officials told the media of a "chemical facility" found in the southern town of Najaf. "Bob, as you know, there's a lot of talk right now about a chemical cache that has been found at a chemical facility," MSNBC anchor Forrest Sawyer told White House correspondent Bob Kur. "I underscore, we do not know what the chemicals are, but it sure has gotten spread around fast."
It sure had. Over on Fox News Channel (3/23/03), the headline banners were already rolling: "HUGE CHEMICAL WEAPONS FACTORY FOUND IN SO IRAQ.... REPORTS: 30 IRAQIS SURRENDER AT CHEM WEAPONS PLANT.... COAL TROOPS HOLDING IRAQI IN CHARGE OF CHEM WEAPONS." The Jerusalem Post, whose embedded reporter helped break the story along with a Fox correspondent, announced in a front-page headline (3/24/03), "U.S. Troops Capture First Chemical Plant."
The next day (10/24/03), a Fox correspondent in Qatar quietly issued an update to the story: The "chemical weapons facility discovered by coalition forces did not appear to be an active chemical weapons facility." Further testing was required. In fact, U.S. officials had admitted that morning that the site contained no chemicals at all and had been abandoned long ago (Dow Jones wire, 3/24/03).
So went the weapons hunt. On numerous occasions, the discovery of a stash of illegal Iraqi arms was loudly announced--often accompanied by an orgy of triumphalist off-the-cuff punditry--only to be deflated inconspicuously, and in a lower tone of voice, until the next false alarm was sounded. In one episode, embedded NPR reporter John Burnett (4/7/03) recounted the big news he'd learned from a "top military official": "the first solid confirmed existence of chemical weapons by the Iraqi army." According to Burnett, an army unit near Baghdad had discovered "20 BM-21 medium-range rockets with warheads containing sarin nerve gas and mustard gas."
When NPR Morning Edition anchor Susan Stamberg asked Burnett, "So this is really a major discovery, isn't it?" he assented: "If it turns out to be true, the commander told us this morning this would be a smoking gun. This would vindicate the administration's claims that the Iraqis had chemicals all along." Of course, it turned out not to be true. A Pentagon official, Maj. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, told reporters the next day (4/8/03) that he had "seen nothing in official reports that would corroborate that."
On April 26, ABC World News Tonight blared an "exclusive" report: "U.S. troops discover chemical agents, missiles and what could be a mobile laboratory in Iraq." Correspondent David Wright explained that the Army soldiers had found "14 55-gallon drums, at least a dozen missiles and 150 gas masks" testing positive for chemical weapons, including a nerve agent and a blistering agent. He added that an Army lieutenant "says the tests have an accuracy of 98 percent."
Perhaps somewhat self-consciously, ABC followed Wright's report with a short segment about previous weapons claims that turned out to be false alarms. But the network continued to pump the story the next day, with anchor Carole Simpson introducing it as the lead segment on World News Sunday (4/27/03): "For the second day in a row, some of the preliminary tests have come back positive for chemical agents."
But when the U.S. Mobile Exploration Team (MET Bravo) arrived on the scene to conduct its own tests, it "tentatively concluded that there are no chemical weapons at a site where American troops said they had found chemical agents and mobile labs," the New York Times reported the next day (4/28/03). A member of the team told the Times simply: "The earlier reports were wrong."
-------------- lots more stuff here -------------
Centerpiece or hot air?
Having suffered a series of public humiliations from the conspicuous absence of unconventional weapons, the administration made it known that it was pinning its hopes on two trailers found in northern Iraq, which they termed mobile biological weapons labs. On May 12, NBC News correspondent Jim Avila, reporting from Baghdad, declared that the labs "may be the most significant WMD findings of the war." Joining him was hawkish former U.N. nuclear inspector David Kay (now an "NBC News analyst"), who was flown to Iraq to perform an impromptu inspection for the cameras. Armed with a pointer, he rattled off the trailer 's parts: "This is a compressor. You want to keep the fermentation process under pressure so it goes faster. This vessel is the fermenter...." In his report, Avila didn't explain how and why Kay and the NBC crew obtained access to the trailers while the legally mandated U.N. inspection team, UNMOVIC, had been barred from looking at them.
The trailers quickly became the "centerpiece" (New York Times, 5/21/03) of the administration's argument that Iraq was indeed hiding a biowarfare program, and Bush himself used them to proclaim (5/31/03) that "for those who say we haven't found the banned manufacturing devices or banned weapons, they're wrong. We found them." No actual biological agents were found on the trucks, though; nor were any ingredients for biological weapons. In fact, no direct evidence linked the trailers to biological production at all.
U.S. officials said the trailers' equipment was capable of making such agents. Even then, the unconcentrated slurry that resulted could not have been put into a weapon: "Other units that we have not yet found would be needed to prepare and sterilize the media and to concentrate and possibly dry the agent, before the agent is ready for introduction into a delivery system," the CIA's report admitted (5/28/03).
Iraqi scientists who worked at the institute where one of the trailers was found offered a different explanation: They told interrogators that the labs were used to produce hydrogen for military weather balloons. "Even while conceding that the equipment could, in fact, have been used occasionally to make hydrogen" (New York Times, 5/21/03), the CIA report dismissed that explanation, reasoning that such a production technique "would be inefficient." (Yet the weapon-making technique imputed to the trailers was also "inefficient," an intelligence official admitted--New York Times, 5/29/03.) In fact, a technical analysis alone, they said, "would not lead you intuitively and logically to biological warfare" (New York Times, 5/29/03).
On the other hand, the trailer's equipment "appeared to contain traces of aluminum, a metal that can be used to create hydrogen." Yet that was discounted by U.S. officials, who said the aluminum "might have been planted by Iraqis to create the illusion that the units had made gas for weather balloons" (New York Times, 5/21/03).
A few weeks later, a front-page New York Times article by Judith Miller and William Broad (6/7/03) quoted senior intelligence analysts who doubted the trailers were used for biological weapons. "I have no great confidence that it's a fermenter," one WMD specialist said of a key piece of equipment on the trailer. (In his TV performance on NBC, David Kay had evinced total confidence that it was.) The CIA report, he said, "was a rushed job and looks political."
Analysts noted that the trailers "lacked gear for steam sterilization, normally a prerequisite for any kind of biological production." "That's a huge minus," said a U.S. government biological expert who had been quoted in an earlier Judith Miller article endorsing the administration's theory. "I don't see how you can clean those tanks chemically." A senior administration official was quoted admitting that "some analysts give the hydrogen claim more credence."
It's worth noting that in the 1980s, the British defense contractor Marconi received a government-backed loan to sell the Iraqi army an Artillery Meteorological System, an artillery radar system that uses weather balloons to track wind patterns (London Guardian, 2/28/03).
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These surveys never make any sense because they can never apply their research to the interests of everyone. If what makes you happy, be it the music scene, cultural scene, dance, work, or community of folks with a common interest etc... can only be had in a less than "optimal" place, then that is paradise to you. There are just way too many factors to weigh for people that have interests outside of just going to work and coming home for 30 years, raising kids, then dying. If you have any life at all outside that, then these surveys are meaningless because they only consider one or two economic factors. If you truly loved bowling would you want to live somewhere with no bowling alley for 50 miles no matter how great a bargain the local economy is?
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wrote:

These surveys never make any sense because they can never apply their research to the interests of everyone. If what makes you happy, be it the music scene, cultural scene, dance, work, or community of folks with a common interest etc... can only be had in a less than "optimal" place, then that is paradise to you. There are just way too many factors to weigh for people that have interests outside of just going to work and coming home for 30 years, raising kids, then dying. If you have any life at all outside that, then these surveys are meaningless because they only consider one or two economic factors. If you truly loved bowling would you want to live somewhere with no bowling alley for 50 miles no matter how great a bargain the local economy is? ================================================ Well, these were all sizable cities, so bowling shouldn't be a problem. :)
Sure, an individual has to sleuth specifics, but cheap, low crime, good schools is a good basic beginning. Makes more sense to me than NYeffingCity, where a 500 sq ft studio costs $500,000, just to be cool, and near Robert fuknDeNiro.
--
EA







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wrote:

Yes Gumby, we all know how loony you are. Not many think the republicans were not to blame. How does it feel to be such a nut case?
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Existential Angst wrote:

I'm surprised no Texas cities were listed. We have no State income tax, and median home prices in HOU are about $120k.
--

"I don't like to discriminate against terrorists based on nationality.
If you declare war on the United States and you want to kill us,
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