1/2" pipes - what does that give you

Hi,
I'm remodeling my bathroom. My house has 1/2" copper pipes and I'm wondering what I can do with that. I know that the answer is most certainly "depends" and most cases but I'm looking for ball park estimates.
For example, I know that I won't be able to run two showerheads with a rainfall shower head and 8 jets.
But will I be able to run two concurrent showers (i.e two showerheads)? What about a showerhead and 5 jets?
Many thanks in advance!
Aaron Fude
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Have your plumber upgrade the primary supply lines to 3/4". Should be in the ballpark of $1k for an average house. HTH
Joe
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Aaron Fude wrote:

If you want to waste that much water and the energy to heat it you will need larger piping.
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our hhome has half inch indoors but 3/4 underground main. showering was always a problem, if someone ran cold water scald would result......
couldnt get good parts anymore for our 3 valve tub shower fixture.
replaced with delta pressure balance single handle, well actually it has a double handle one for adjust flow other temperature.
its amazing and works awesome worth all the $ and work wish I had done it years ago!
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First check and see what you have at the meter if it is 1/2 then you only cut the pressure by converting to 3/4 most out sides on meters are 1/2 pipe thread going out . As someone else said why do you need this as you will only use your hot water faster and cost more to operate and all heads will still only deliver 9.5 litres a minute max. This can be done but the systems by Meon and Delta are pricey so do some investigation first. 2 shower heads and 2 jets max probaly
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wrong, wrong, and wrong.
s

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only cut the pressure by converting to 3/4 most out sides on meters are 1/2 pipe thread going out .<<<<<<
As per Steve's comment.....putting 3/4" copper (or even 1" copper) on a 1/2" meter will NOT cut the pressure delivered to house.
A water system's supply performance is governed by the static system at the meter and the total pressure loss from supply to point of use, imposed by the combination of the meter, supply line to house & the supply line to the various fixture and the instantaneous water demand.
I just re-piped with a PEX home run (manifold system). I've got a 3/4" meter supplying a 1" copper line (~40 ft to the house, another 25 ft to the manifolds). My static supply pressure is regulated down to 65 psi at the house (from about 72 psi at the meter).
I can run the outside sprinklers, the washer & the dishwasher...all coming on & off while showering. Yeah, I notice slight pressure changes but no scalding, even with the toilet that shares the shower cold water supply being flushed. A bigger supply line from the meter to the house will preserve more of the supply pressure (ie less pressure drop from meter to house).
OP-
Your house having 1/2" copper tubing is a good start...what size is your meter, the supply line (length, mat'l & size) to the house, the static water pressure and the house piping layout (length, size & shared demands)
Whether or not you can run two shower heads will depend on their water demand & the factors above.
1/2" copper lines can provide pretty decent flow, given good supply pressure and a 3/4" or 1" main line.
cheers Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

But he is talking about a 5~7 gallon/minute water and energy to heat it extravaganza.
I know someone who had one of those put in their house and they had to have a large size commercial high input water heater installed to keep up with the high volume waste.
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