0W20 oil

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On Sun, 4 Oct 2009 13:52:32 -0700 (PDT), Shy Picker

Maybe this the best time to use synthetic, when the engine is new and doesn't dribble over the highway, or burn oil (although if it's going to burn oil, SAE 0 will burn the most.)
And synthetic lasts longer, I forget how long, althought does one want to do that with a new engine?
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Well, if you have any engine trouble that might be covered by the warranty, they might just check to see what viscosity you actually used. If you didn't follow their requirements, there goes your warranty. Try getting a flat fixed with the new TPMS systems.
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Tony Hwang wrote: ...

The SAE rating isn't an actual viscosity; ergo, 0W-30 oil doesn't have zero viscosity at the colder test temperature (0C iirc, 100C (~210F)) for the higher.
There's a chart of a range of performance conditions by which the shorthand rating is determined for any given oil. Roughly, at least originally, the lower rating was roughly the "pour point" in C; that has become more refined and includes things like max cranking power. The actual viscosity part of the test is still performed at 100C but is a test for the minimum time (that is, the oil can't run at a lower rate than that specified as the grade standard) as opposed to a min/max time range for the high temp rating.
Use of pour point depressant additives can make any oil base perform to the tests; what is chosen to be used is a combination of design parameters as well as cost. Adding more additives raises cost as well as can shorten life as additives wear out during use.
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wrote:

If they make oil that is SAE 0, what is the viscosity of water?
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Depends on temperature
32F 1.79
60F 1.129
70F 0.982
200F 0.305
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wrote:

Come on, you made that up. You must have.
Why would 70 degree water be thinner than 60 degree, and how could either be thicker than oil of any sort?
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mm wrote:

By law of physics. Won't matter at temp. engine is running water will boil(evaporate).
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http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/absolute-dynamic-viscosity-water-d_575.html
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mm wrote: ...

The SAE rating is _NOT_ the viscosity itself; it's simply a rating system related to viscosity at two reference temperatures (0 and 100 C)
Initially, the lower number roughly correlated w/ the "pour point" of the oil in C; now it's more sophisticated set of tests; see other posting for a (very) brief summary or google it for details.
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I would go to the dealer. Filter would probably cost a bit more, but you know you have a good one, or at least one recommended by the mfg. Bob-tx
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Yep, that's what the dealers would like you to do. If you can find a good aftermarket filter for Porsches there is no reason you can't find one for a Toyota too. After all, I doubt Toyota is making the filter and oil.
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I swear this is true. I knew a guy who had bought a new kawasaki moped for his wife (I think in the 1980's). When ever he needed 2 stroke oil he would only buy it at the Kawasaki dealer. He did this for years. Then one day he went to the dealer for something else (I forget what?) and he wasn't treated like a king. He told whoever he was talking to that he is a loyal customer and always buys the 2 stroke oil there!!!! They still couldn't help him with whatever his problem was and he badmouthed them ever since. And he actually still tells people that he always bought the 2 cycle oil at the dealer because of course Kawasaki oil would be the best choice for a Kawasaki motor!
When it came time to buy a computer for his daughter he decided that since IBM was so big in computers from the early days, that the best possible PC would be an IBM, and price didn't matter if he was buying the best. So he paid out the ass for an IBM and every possible accessory that had the IBM name on it.
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My 0-20 synthetic Mobil 1 with filter was 60$ at Jiffy Lube, Here Auto Zone and sears has the oil but I would only save 15$ doing it myself, I bet even walmart has the oil.
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hibb wrote:

It's obviously too new to be widely distributed. Mobil makes it. See here: http://synthetic-motor-oil-air-filters.com/synthetic-oil/0W-20-synthetic-motor-oil.htm
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hibb wrote:

"Class A" service. Our owner's manual also specifies 0W20 oil. The itemized work list shows that they used 5W20. We live in the Washington, D.C. metro area. I assume that the dealer used factory authorized oil.
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This is why I change the oil. I buy it at Walmart. My manual says 5W20 can be used in a pinch but it should be changed for 0W20 as soon as possible.
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Retirednoguilt wrote:

Don't assume that the dealer automatically uses the recommended oil.
I had an oil change on my 4Runner at the dealer. The manual recommends 5W30, they used 10W30 because it's what they have in their bulk oil tank. I had them change it to 5W30 which they had only in bottles.
By now they probably switched their bulk oil to 5W30.
My relative has an auto repair shop in San Francisco. When 5W20 first came out it was for Hondas, and he could not buy it from his oil supplier, only from Honda. The Honda parts person told him that the Honda dealer just used 5W30 on the vehicles that specified 5W20 because the 5W20 was much more expensive. But an independent shop needs to be more careful than the dealer for liability reasons, and not use the wrong oil. Now he has 5W30 in his bulk tank, and uses bottled 5W20 which is available from many oil jobbers.
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wrote:

The company cannot recommend it because they MUST recommend the oil used to qualify the car for CAFE under American law. The only difference between using 5W20 and 5w30 is about 2/10 mpg fuel economy (at best)
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If you moved away from the dealer who sold you this car, ask the nearest vendor of Matrix vehicles.
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Lou
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