Who eats my hostas?

Page 1 of 2  
Does anyone know who the culprit is here? By the middle/end of summer our hostas leaves are all holey and eaten, looks like bugs (not animals) but we don't know what is doing it or how to treat it.
They've just come in nice and full so if there is something preventative to do I'd like to find out. I'd prefer something natural over chemical.
We're in Long Island, NY - I think that's zone 6? (not positive - I'm a total newbie in the garden!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
nanner wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What's she look like? I may eat her..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Slugs
By the middle/end of summer our

Slug bait. "Bug geta" comes to mind. Shallow bowls of beer. Bury the bowl so that the rim is at ground level. Try spraying with hot sauce. I wonder how that would work in their slimy slug bodies. <beg>

Uh, forget the bug geta stuff.

Google is a newbie's friend.
-- Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
nanner wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

we don't have deer here. I agree it's slugs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WorryFree or Sluggo, slug and snail bait, works for me. And it works good. Safe for birds and pets too!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

thank you - i'll look for those
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a chemical. (fyi) (even beer is a chemical..hicup) :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

they love slugs and snails.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've heard a saucer of beer will drown slugs.
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with the deer theory. They regularly mow mine down real good. Are you sure you don't have deer? They are very common in the NY metro area and typically forage at night, when you don't see them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

deer have bad teeth? :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL- I am in Western Nassau County on Long Island - anyone know the area? I don't know where the deer would hide! They could all be hiding behind the dumpster at the supermarket till nightfall I suppose! Or wearing disguises and working at 7-11?
I'm sorry - just funny ideas - I am pretty sure there are deer out east on Long Island.
Maybe I'll try to convinve DH to let me have ducks :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rolling Thunder wrote:

favorite beverage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, but did it work?
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
nanner wrote:

This took all of 2-1/2 seconds to find on google.
Hosta Pests Slugs and Snails
Slugs and snails are nocturnal foragers and are the most common pest of hostas. They eat small round holes in the leaves. By beginning an abatement program early in the spring, slugs may be easier to control. Look for silvery slime trails in garden beds to determine if slugs are present. They may be spotted during daylight hours or in the evening by using a flashlight. Since some plants are more susceptible to slug injury, check around those particular plants to detect slugs. Thin-leafed hostas and those with leaves growing close to the ground are most susceptible to slug injury.
Chemical slug pellets and baits that contain metaldehyde are widely available commercially, however label directions must be followed carefully. A new product came on the market in 2000 that shows some success in slug control; it contains iron phosphate, which is less toxic to animals and birds than baits containing metaldehyde.
Beer traps are widely used, albeit only moderately successfully. Place a small shallow container, such as a jar lid, level with the soil and fill with beer. Slugs are attracted to it, crawl in, and drown.
Other methods can be used, though they show limited success. Copper strips sold in garden stores and catalogs may be used to surround plants. The use of gritty materials such as diatomaceous earth scattered on the soil surface is also used. Other traps may be made by laying wet newspapers on the ground overnight. Check beneath these the next day to find slugs that have taken refuge from heat and sun. Kill the slugs by dropping them into a 1020% solution of ammonia and water. Salt will also kill slugs if applied directly to them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i would try some liquid seven , reapply after every rain. lucas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Slugs. Someone already mentioned the beer trick. Also, take away their hiding places. Unfortunately, this often means removing mulch, but hey....you do what you have to do. Also, you didn't mention whether all the leaves get eaten, or just the ones closest to the ground. If just the lowest, get underneath with a sharp knife or pruning shears and remove those leaves, cutting the stems as close to the plant as you can. That'll allow some air circulation, making the ground a little drier underneath. Slugs like shade and moisture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.