What type of grass to sew this fall

Last fall I decided I wanted toi try my hands at putting in a good lawn. I rototilled my front lawn and subsequently checked and adjusted the pH. I added a small amount of fertilizer and plantend Scotts Pure Premium Tall Fescue grass seed. This was in mid-October which is very pleasant here in Tennessee. In fact we had a week of warm weather and light rain that combined to have the seedlings popping up within a few days of planting. The winter came and went and this spring showed me something that I was really amazed at. My lawn looked like a golf course ! Short lived though. By mid-June my lawn was invaded with weeds even though I had used both a pre-emergent in February and a weed-&-feed in May. We had a week of high-temperatures which ran near or over 100 every day. I thought that the grass had gone dormant but evidently it simply died.
To cut this rather long story short, I'm looking for recommendations for a grass that can handle drought and high-heat without completely dying. I live about 60 miles south-east of Nashville, Tennessee and water isn't an issue as there is plenty around here. We have an underground stream on our property (and I mean real shallow!) as well as an above-ground stream about 100' down the road. The lawn usually has a heady dew and in fact I have to keep is mowed somewhat short or it will not dry out before sundown. Of course it does get cold here as well and I also have some dense shady areas where I was planning on putting creeping fescue.
Thanks for your recommendations.
JD Photography - www.puresilver.org - www.darkroompro.com Motorcycles - www.xs750.net Music - www.picknparlor.net
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Me too. I had a nice lawn until it got hot. Now I have this weed that I thought I killed coming back and the grass is very sparse even with watering.I think the heavy rains of the last several years keep washing the nutrients and my fertilizer off. I'm about 50 miles furthr south than you.
--------------010402090305090209060905 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> <font size="+1">Me too. <br> I had a nice lawn until it got hot. Now I have this weed that I thought I killed coming back and the grass is very sparse even with watering.I think the heavy rains of the last several years keep washing the nutrients and my fertilizer off.<br> I'm about 50 miles furthr south than you.<br> </font> </body> </html>
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wrote:

What seed were you using ? I'm thinking about just using plain ol' K31 as it cheap. I've read that some of the new stuff looks exactly like the "premium" tall fescues.
JD Photography - www.puresilver.org - www.darkroompro.com Motorcycles - www.xs750.net Music - www.picknparlor.net
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Varieties may look alike but have very different habits or resistance...
Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/turf/publications/tallfesc.html Varieties. Kentucky-31 and Alta are the 2 oldest varieties of tall fescue in use today. Alta was selected from a stand of tall fescue in Oregon in 1923 and K-31 is an increase from tall fescue found in 1931 on a Kentucky farm where it had been growing for 50 years. Both of these grasses are coarse textured and produce a rather weak turf. They have been widely used as pasture grasses in the transition zone. Kenwell, Kenhy, Fawn and Goar were later releases, but possessed similar turf characteristics. In the 1970's, tall fescues were being developed specifically for turfgrasses and varieties such as Rebel, Olympic, Houndog, Falcon and Adventure were released. These new turf-type tall fescues are finer textured and produce a denser turf than older pasture-type varieties. They also provide year-round green color for lawns. Bonsai tall fescue is a newly released dwarf variety with outstanding turf quality
some variety info... http://www.sroseed.com/Products/VDB/8000.html
Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets. To plant a pine, one need only own a shovel. -- Aldo Leopold
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I used three different varieties of fescue including Rebel and two others that I don't remember. I figured the best for the area would certainly survive. I'm real disapointed. I have Zoysia or something that has most of thesuides and back yard and it is thick and lush and has taken over any and all bare spots. The only problem it won't grow under my Oaks and Hickorys worth a damn and it looks like a cocoa mat during late fall and winter. I'm at wits end.
--------------070404070605060305010202 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> <font size="+1">I used three different varieties of fescue including Rebel and two others that I don't remember. I figured the best for the area would certainly survive. I'm real disapointed.<br> I have Zoysia or something that has most of thesuides and back yard and it is thick and lush and has taken over any and all bare spots.<br> The only problem it won't grow under my Oaks and Hickorys worth a damn and it looks like a cocoa mat during late fall and winter.<br> I'm at wits end.<br> </font> </body> </html>
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wrote:

Well the wife and I have decided to try Scotts again. Specifically cotts Pure Premium Heat-Tolerant Blue Grass Seed. See :
http://www.scotts.com/index.cfm/event/ProductGuide.product/documentType/product/category/%2FCategories%2FProducts%2FGrass+Seed%2FGrass+Seed+Seeding+Mixes/documentId/8cd29cd2d6cc930cdfd92dc326cc8024
If that doesn't work then we'll go with Zenith Zosia when the price has come down a little. $25/pound is just a little over the top.
John
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Hrmm..
Have you looked at the improved turf-type tall fescues yet?
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"Have you looked at the improved turf-type tall fescues yet? "
Speaking of that, has anyone tried the new tall fescue that has been bred to have rhizomes, so that instead of being a clump type grass as std tall fescue, it will spread? There's info about it at www.aboutrtf.com.
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That's what we have/had. Specifically Scotts Pure Premium Tall Fescue Mix. It's a great grass and I higly recommend it to anyone north of Tennessee. Perhaps even to those in northern Tennessee. But we're 55 miles southeast of Nashville and the weather here is remekably different. My sister lives about 40 miles north of Nashville and our weather is a good deal warmer and we seem to get much more rain.
JD
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The grass probably dies from lack of water, not the heat. Or was mowed to low preventing it from combatting the heat and loss of moisture.
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/turf/publications/tallfesc.html

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wrote:

Nope. I'm very careful and follow recommendations from the manufacturers. I keep it at 2" year round. Also our property has one stream under it and the lack of water would only be a problem is we didn't have rain for more than a month IMO. The heavy dews we have in the morning are amazing. I have to leep the areas in shade mowed short or they'll never dry out.
JD
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Dew will not irrigate turfgrass very much, it will add a bit of nitrogen tho.
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Interesting. I wasn't aware of that. Can you give me some more details ? Also, while the 2" mowing height is somewhat minimal, I do generally allow it to grow for at least 1 week between mowings. 8" is max height though. I really prefer it to be around 3" however I assume that the taller grass provides shade and traps moisture better.
JD
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