Using PL-Premium (construction adhesive) to fill holes in tree trunks

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On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 13:03:34 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Forever- and in my kitchen. I haven't done it since I installed a humidifier, so the extra humidity has been welcome.
I set it on a slow boil for a couple days-- It doesn't need any attention until it starts to color up a bit. [Then things can get tricky fast- I never had problems with boiling 100gallons of sap adding too much moisture to the house-- but on a couple occasions it went from syrup to sugar to carbon while I wasn't paying attention. *That* stinks up the house.]
I probably use one burner on the stove for 12 hours a day for 2-3 weeks to yield 3-4 gallons of syrup & a bit of sugar candy. [wild ass guesses - I haven't done it in a few years.
Hmmmm- just thought of another use for my new Bayou burner-- I might do some sap next spring and just finish it in the kitchen.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Um - I didn't think that silver maples gave good syrup. That's why sugar maples are called "sugar maples".
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I have 2 sugar maples on the other side of my house. Probably about the same age as my silver- about 2feet in diameter. [the silver is 3-4] I tapped them a couple years. They gave less sap and it was not as sweet as the silver.
I've talked to others with the same experience. Sugar maples are less prone to limb damage and don't have surface roots. But other than that I don't know why sugarbushes don't use them more.
Jim [BTW- I've never tapped them, but others have extolled the virtues of white birch and Box Elder [aka Black Maple] sap.]
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That's a sugar maple. Leaves shaped like the one on the Canadian flag, with dark grey-brown bark and well-behaved roots (they stay underground).
Silver maples have white bark, leaves are pointed ovals, dark green on top and silver-white on the bottom, with roots that break the surface every 2-3 feet.
Sugar maples are good trees; silver maples are not.
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net (Gary Heston) wrote:

No. no. no, and definitely don't.

Also known as swamp, river, white, soft, or water maple. The Latin taxonomy is Acer saccharinum. An argument has been made that Linnaeus meant for the Silver Maple to be a sugar maple-- it was a century later that someone named the Eastern US 'sugar' maple. ("The Sugar Maples" by Benjamin Franklin Bush, American Midland Naturalist, Vol. 12, No. 11 (Sep., 1931), pp. 499-503)
See my other post for my own experience with both species on my property.

There are no bad trees-- just trees that don't please us sometimes.<g> I am willing to put up with my Silver's foibles in exchange for its benefits.
Jim
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