Turf beside existing lawn?

I've just bought a house which has a large rear lawn, broken up with
missmatch of patios and random beds. I want to remove these and gro grass which would match in with the existing lawn. I was going to tur these areas but am now worried that the two won't blend. Any advise
-- Tim Boyle
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Tim Boyle said:

Are you planning on using the same species of grass?
--

Eggs

I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not sure.
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Eggs Zachtly Wrote:

Good point - I'm not that up on grass but I guess I could find out wha species it is before turfing - or seeding if that is simpler. Also I' told that turfing is now equivalent or cheaper than seeding 0 is tha your understanding?
Ti
-- Tim Boyle
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Tim Boyle wrote:

Seeding is cheaper, at least here in the northeast USA. But we don't know if you're in Boston or Bangladesh. For small areas though the cost may be well worth it for the convenience. However, your best chance of matching the existing grass is to have it identified. Is there a local AG county service in your area?
If the areas are small relative to the existing lawn and the existing lawn is the type of grass you want (ie suited for the climate, color, texture, disease resistance, water needs, etc), then the best solution would be to seed the new areas and overseed the whole thing at the same time. This would be particularly effective if the rest of the area could use some thickening up.
Alternatively, if the rest of the lawn isn't that great, you could kill the whole thing off with Roundup, then reseed a week later with the appropriate grass. That is guaranteed to produce uniform results.
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Tim Boyle said:

That would be a good idea. ;)

Neither is all that difficult, depending on the grade of the area. Slice-seeding is the most effective way of seeding the area, but depending on where you live, the optimum time for seeding may have passed. The seeder may be hard to come by. Some rental places stock them. As long as the ground is thawed, you can lay sod. Keep in mind that you'll be watering a bit more often, until the roots take.

The obvious positives about sodding are: The results are instantaneous. There was a bare spot, and there is instant lawn. There are also no weeds (assuming the sod comes from a reputable farm).
The drawbacks: It costs more (negligible, when doing a small area).
With seeding, drawbacks are: Keeping traffic off of it, until the lawn gets established. Giving it the correct amount of moisture, until it gets established. Keeping the birds from eating the seed, until it germinates. Etc, etc, etc. It all takes time.
IMO, seeding is too high-maintanence for my available time. I've renovated all of my beds, have all of the new ones in that I need, and the last thing to do with my yard's renovation, is the lawn. I have two dogs that I'd never be able to keep confined to a small area, so I'll be sodding. I have an advantage on the cost of the sod, due to my employment. We've a major project at work that will involve many truckloads of sod. I'll purchase a few pallets at the same time. In your case, sodding would probably be the way to go, also. It's not a large area, and it's a heckuva lot less work, in the long run.
HTH
--

Eggs

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