Still going back and forth with Sears

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Clark wrote:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07128738000P?filter=Horsepower%7C22+hp&vName=Lawn+%26+Garden&cName=Lawn+Tractors&sName=Lawn+Tractor+Series&sLevel=2|3
Likely the deck hangers are bent. I'd guess when you hit that "twig" (that stopped the mower and bent the deck into the blade) it shoved the entire deck back and bent some stuff.
I have to take issue with your original description of events. It just doesn't ring entirely true. The stick you showed could not have caused the damage you described. At worst it would have jammed between the blade tip and deck, bend the blade, and caused everything to stop, maybe even break a belt. But the fact that the blade cut into the deck means that the deck was pushed (read bent) into the path of the blade. That takes a pretty substantial amount of force. You said the engine also stopped which makes me think that whatever you hit was large enough to stop the forward motion of the tractor. Maybe a stump or some other immovable object?
Was Kathy using it when it happened or were you?
--
Art

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Art wrote:

Hi Art.
I was on the mower, what happened was the blade hit the stick the stick then like catapulted the blade into the mower deck (this deck is one of the fancy high output types so the deck is not flat but dips from the top down towards the discharge) so the blade hits the deck cuts into the deck about 2 1/2 inches and that is when everything stopped.
I never hit anything that would have bent anything like hangers which in my case would be beneficial because the mower is advertised to have a 4 inch cut and is only slightly less than 3 1/2 inches, and that's without my fat ass on it. gotta be nearer 3 when I'm on, (I weight 185)
Clark
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Clark wrote:

I have seen a lot of bent blades but I've never seen one that was bent such that it stretched and sliced into the deck. Let's just say it is a 20" blade. That is 10" from the center bolt or it's pivot point to the tip. The deck will be approximately 10-1/4" minimum distance from that same point. It is physically impossible to bend a blade (by hitting a stick of any size) in such a way that it becomes longer. The deck *must* be bent for that to happen. Either the spindle mounting point was twisted causing the blade pivot point to move or the edge of the deck was pushed into the path of the blade. Either way that would take a pretty substantial amount of force and more than the stick you describe could possibly be responsible for.
--
Art

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Art wrote:

ok Art, you have compelled me to tell my deck wreck story.
it all happened when I was mowing over a location where I knew a sweet gum root was sticking up higher than cutting level 3 and I forgot to raise the deck to cutting level 4. the deck itself hit the root with sufficient force driving the deck back into the blade on the right side. the blade actually sliced into the deck and cut in a downward direction for about one inch. the blade did not bend the portion of the deck where the blade pivot point, referred to as the spindle, bent.
the PTO belt got a flat spot burned on it before I was able to disengage the PTO. lots of stinky white smoke was all I got for my ruined belt. the flat spot was sufficient to force the discarding of the belt since it produced the out of balance thumping that will lead to a ruined oil seal on the PTO shaft extending from the bottom of the 22hp motor where the PTO belt runs on it's pulley.
at this point I was thoroughly pissed off with myself since it had only been about 2 weeks prior I'd had to do major repairs as a result of the big down hill ditch wreck. I decided to work off the hostilities by attacking the sweet gum root. I felt better after that sweet gum root was declared to be no more.
the next day I removed the deck, stripped it down and reintroduced it to the 10 pound maul the anvil the torch and the welder. I could almost hear the deck saying "oh shit not again." after enjoying a nice day in my workshop and some really good coffee the deck was restored to it's correct shape with the addition of some new reinforcing structural stabilizers. the repair worked out well and now when I go over the spot where the sweet gum root used to be, I just smile.
ps: I feel sorry for people who have to call for help and then wait for someone to show up with their name written on their shirt.
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on 8/30/2007 6:32 PM Jim said the following:

Here in the glacial carved Hudson Valley, we have buried rocks the size of Volkswagens. You cannot dig a hole more than a foot deep without hitting a rock which may be from the size of a football up to the aforementioned VW. I have been scalping rocks and tree branches, with my cheap Murray tractor and mower deck, that are much bigger than the OP's bout with a twig. I have never bent a blade so much as to even scrape the sides or top of the metal mower deck. When I do my annual sharpening, I may have to straighten a blade a little with my hammer and vise anvil. If I had happen what the OP experienced, I would have bought, borrowed, or stolen a truck, to bring it right back to Sears, drive it inside and left it on the floor if they didn't get me a new one.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

now that's the attitude I can admire, appreciate and respect. if you ever need someone to hold the door open while you're driving one back inside, you just let me know.. the visual of those sears customers scurrying for their safety puts a big grin on my wide eyed country boy face.
best 2U
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Art wrote:

Sorry Art this deck is not like other decks, I know exactly what your talking about, but this deck dips down at the discharge (behind it), I guess it's some kinda aerodynamic thing, If you want I can post a link to a picture.
Clark
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on 8/30/2007 7:01 PM Clark said the following:

Actually, it is like all other mower decks. The back of the deck is set at the depth desired and the front is a little higher. The idea is that the mower deck cuts twice. The front of the blades make the first cut higher than the depth setting and the trailing edge makes the second cut to the depth desired. Instead of leaving long blades of cut grass, there will be shorter pieces.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 8/31/2007 9:41 AM, willshak wrote:

I take great care leveling my decks. If the front lip seems high, it merely eases movement into the swath. Blades tilted up enough to make a difference regarding grass height/blade length would be noticeable in the finished lawn. The effect you mention (usually on high-end mowers/blades) can be achieved with a blade that looks as if the first inch or two has been twisted up; edge on the blade looks (or doesn't look) like this: ___ ___ \_____------I------_____/
Lawns around Lake Sam Rayburn are very sandy, tending to erode the tips of blades. When eroded past their useful life, they leave a slight ridge with twin blade decks and two ridges with triples. Blades tilted up would tend to do the same. One of my lawn tractors, a twin blade 40" Murray, suffered my backing over a thick door mat. (Hemp, I do believe.) After trying to get the kink out of the blades, I replaced them, but couldn't get the ever so slight warp out of the deck. As long as I used a 1/4" spacer on the left side of the deck when leveling, it cut perfectly. Otherwise, the lawn looked like I cut it with a low tire. Tires are another thing. At 8 or 10 psi, most gauges aren't accurate enough to get tires exactly the same pressure. Turf tires can vary,too. The best way to adjust tire pressure is with a tape measure or length of string marked with the front and rear circumference of the tires. Simply loop the tape or string around the tire and adjust the air pressure till both sides are equal. It might surprise you that the actual pressure might differ from left to right. As long as the circumference is equal, you will be level. (Measure twice, bleed once.) I may be wrong on these points, but they have served me well. I've been cutting St Augustine since nineteen and fifty somethin'. Any are welcomed (and encouraged) to disagree (except the mean ol' trolls).
--
Ted
I wasn't born in Texas but
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Good advice.

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willshak wrote:

No, you have that backwards. The blade is tipped ever so slightly forward to cause the front edge to be just slightly lower. This greatly increases the vacuum and it it lowers the drag on the blade.
But I agree that his deck is like others. Basic deck design pretty much the same across the board. The deck will dip down behind the discharge. That is what "encourages" the air and grass to leave through the discharge chute.
--
Art

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http://www.duke.edu/~rkl7/Images/slob.jpg
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Steveo wrote:

He has darker hair, but I figure he looks like that on a sunday morning. grin
Clark
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