Scotts® Turf Builder® With PLUS 2® Weed Control

* Kills dandelions and other broadleaf weeds. * Scotts smaller particles stick to weeds better and kill them completely -- root and all * Builds a thick, green lawn from the roots up * Won't burn your lawn...Guaranteed!
This crap is a waste of money and it will burn and I have more weeds now. Yes, I set the spreader correctly and I water early in the morning. I am in the North East so if this is not surprising because of the weather here - please enlighten me. Also if I should avoid Scott's products also let me know. Should I get down and actually pull these by hand
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NoSpamPls said:

When did you apply it, and at what rate?
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Eggs Zachtly wrote:

the reply. Maybe my spreader/or I was malfunctioning which I guess could be the reason for some burnt/brown spots and I have been guilty of that before but if I did get it down why didn't it reduce the weeds on the areas not burnt/browned?
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NoSpamPls said:

By "rate" I mean, how many pounds per thousand square feet of lawn?

Perhaps you didn't get an even coverage? The product in question has a bad habit of clumping, which can make that difficult.
You also didn't mention what type of weeds you wish to control. What you used won't work on crabgrass or mature dandelions (among others).
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On Sat, 22 Jul 2006 11:36:02 -0400, NoSpamPls wrote:

Granular broadleaf weedkiller needs to be applied when the leaves of the weeds are actually wet, so it will stick better. Otherwise it tends to simply roll off.
So, do it very early in the morning when the leaves are still wet, or mist the lawn with a hose immediately before application.
I've never used Scott's products so I can't comment on them specifically. I'd imagine the nitrogen in this product is mostly sulfer coated urea (slow release nitrogen), and shouldn't cause any "burn" whatsoever if you're applying anything even remotely close to the recommended amount.
Hope that helps.
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NoSpamPls wrote:

http://www.lesco.com/Default.aspx
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As others have pointed out, a lot depends on the user and following directions. To be effective, the granular herbicide needs to hit a wet weed and stick. It also needs to be applied at the right rate. The herbicide is only affective against most broadleaf weeds. So, if it's crabgrass that's the problem, it's not going to work. Also, this is slow release, so burning should not be a problem with this product, unless you apply it beyond the directed rate.
I'm not a big fan of the Weed n Feed type products. They can be useful if the lawn is a complete mess with a lot of weeds. But for a reasonably maintained lawn, spot weed control with a small tank sprayer is more effective and better for the environment. You get maximum effectiveness with minimum herbicide by delivering it where it's needed.
I also would not be fertilizing in the northeast at this time of year. Nitrogen plus hot weather tends to promote disease and fungus.
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NoSpamPls wrote:

I've used the Scotts product you mention with excellent results on tall fescue grass, though it won't kill crabgrass (they have a different product for that).
-jav
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Javier wrote:

The only Scotts products for crabgrass that I am aware of are pre-emergent. Then won't kill crabgrass that is already growing this time of year. They only prevent it from germinating if applied at the right time, which was months ago.
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