Re: 5 Things You Should Know Before Mowing Your Lawn



Most important is amongst the mulching section. Use a sharp blade. Works better if the grass is moist or dry. Chops up the ORGANICALLY degradable mulch better, making it easier to blend into the soil. If you're too lazy or don't know how to sharpen it, replace it every season.
Spam target newsgroups removed in response. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

I don't buy the mulching argument.
In my experience, mulched grass creates a sponge layer at the surface and any rain that comes in the summer (we're having a drought, like we usually seem to do every summer, here in SW-Ontario).
When we get our pathetic quick thunder storms, the rain rolls quickly off our hard-packed clay soils. Any rain that doesn't run off gets absorbed by the dried mulch layer, which then gives it back to the atmosphere when it dries. It prevents the moisture from reaching and being absorbed into the soil surface.
You might say "well, just add better top soil to your lawn". That doesn't work if we're talking about city-owned portion of your front yard, or the grass circle in the middle of a court.
It is universally said that mulched grass contains nutients that are great to give back to your lawn.
Well, if cut grass was so great, then why don't municiple yards that collect yard waste accept it? These places take yard waste (tree branches mostly, maybe pine needles and other stuff you rake) and mulch/compost it and sell it. But they won't take grass. Why not I ask? Everyone says that grass contains all these nutrients? Grass should be great, perfect to add to the ground-up yard waste? But no, they don't take it. If they take it, they charge you $1 a bag.
The truth is that municiple garbage collection and yard-waste management knows that cut grass is useless and nutrient-poor (full of carbon mostly) so they create this con-job and tell people it's better for your lawn to mulch. They just don't want to deal with cut grass so they want you to just leave it in your grass, where it will create thatch that will thin out your grass, harbor bugs and disease and soak up the little, precious water you get in the summer and act like a barrier to prevent the water from getting to the parched soil underneath.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Garden Guy said:

/Valid/ reasons?

I'm sorry, but the above sentence appears as an incomplete thought. "...and any rain...", what? Are you saying that the dried grass clippings soak up all of the rain? You have a source for that?

Ever consider watering between the rains? If you soak your lawn, properly, you shouldn't have the runoff. You can't blame the grass clippings for your neglect.

How much rainfall? Saying a "thunderstorm", no matter how "pathetically quick", usually involves rainfall on the heavier side. There's not enough surface area on the (especially, dried) grass clippings to absorb any measurable amount of moisture. It may slow the water down, in route to the soil, but it certainly doesn't absorb all of the water.

You'll lose /some/ to evaporation, but being shaded by the grass itself, a good amount will reach the soil. A lot will be determined by the weather conditions (does the sun come out, right after the storm, or does it remain overcast?, etc.), as well as the general conditions of the area (full sun? shade? etc.).

Why can't you improve the turf's conditions at the easement?

Who cares? That's the city's problem, not the homeowners.

And, you disagree with that? Are you saying that grass clippings have no nutritional value to turf?

Because of all of the chemicals that people put on their lawns.

Do you apply chemicals to your trees and shrubs, on a regular basis (as regular as your lawn?).
[...]

Wow, Einstein, "full of carbon mostly"? They're living organisms. Of /course/ they're 'mostly carbon'. They're also absolutely loaded with nitrogen (and a lot of other nutrients). Do some homework, eh?

"Truth"?
Source?

Again, source?

Please, give us your understanding of what "thatch" is.

They exist quite well in a lawn that gets "bagged". What bugs and diseases do you speak of, that only exist in "mulched" lawns? Or, alternatively, provide a source stating that bugs and diseases are higher in lawns that are "mulched".

Go buy a sprinkler and quit blaming the grass clippings for your poor lawn conditions.
Good grief, you /really/ sound like Stubby.
--

Eggs

-If a cow laughs hard, does milk come out its nose?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Garden Guy wrote:

[....]
wrong....
when creating pasture grass for animals to graze on you'll learn after doing some research and reading how there are a vast number of lawn products that are strictly forbidden and extremely unwise to use on pasture grasses. these are products commonly used by the typical home owner seeking a green lush healthy lawn. the reason behind this is because these products do indeed end up in the grass and are then ingested by the animal doing the grazing.
as for your problems with mulching, I suspect you're waiting to long in-between cuts and therefore producing more clippings than the lawn can properly absorb before your next cut. for example: the typical recommendation for mowing fescue is to mow when the grass reaches 4 inches in height and to cut back to three inches. when mulching the 4 inch height the cut should only remove 1/2 inch leaving the height at 3.5 inches. proper mulching techniques require more frequent mowing. so, cut and mulch at a height of 3.5 to remove 1/2 inch returning the fescue to the recommend height of 3 inches.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Yeah right. It allways rains at the weekend.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Uhh, I didn't write that, the original poster did. You needed to reply to that, not my later reply... Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Sorry for my in accurate cutting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.