Raising level of lawn

I have three small lawns, each of which is below the level of th
adjacent paths. They are inherited from the previous owner of th house and have not sunk in recent years. I want to raise the levels.
I have read that a new lawn requires to be laid on four inches o topsoil. Can I put four inches of topsoil on top of the existin lawns and then sow seed or put on readymade rolls? Or do I have t dig up the existing grass?
I don't want to re-use the sods of the existing grass as there are lot of weeds (creeping buttercup, dandelions, clover, daisies speedwell and one that looks like pale green miniature spinach).
Joh
-- John S G
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John S G wrote:

Yes. Just put the soil on the old sod and replant/resod. If you want to, you can put some roundup on the old sod and wait a couple of days to put down the new topsoil. No need to do anything with the old soil as long as you are adding 4" of topsoil to the entire yards.
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John S G <NOSPAMgoodwillATindigoDOTie> wrote on 20 Aug 2007 in group alt.home.lawn.garden:

Be aware that adding soil on top of tree roots will likely kill the tree.
If you want, you can apply a short-lived vegetation killer to the existing sod to kill everything that's there. Be sure not to get the stuff that says it lasts a year.
4" of soil cover will kill most grass and weeds, but some will come through. You don't say, but if you're changing species of grass, you probably don't want the stuff underneath to reappear in a few weeks. You definitely don't want the weeds to show up again.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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You could try the "cover the old sod with newspaper and let it rot" trick under the new dirt.
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alt.home.lawn.garden:

I didn't have much luck with that, so I probably did it wrong. I put down a layer five or six sheets thick, overlapping the seams, then covered it with mulch. The bermuda grass came back through. Does it need to be a thicker layer? How thick? Did I miss something?
What do you recommend?
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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wrote:

Let me tell you what I ran into recently. I have a small lemon tree that's about a foot tall, its in a pot about 2 feet all. I've had Bermuda grass creeping near the pot. Huh, bermuda grass, not a fledgling seedling, coming up in the pot. I pulled it up as much as I could from the moist pot soil. Next week, same thing. Looked under the pot. The bermuda grass worked its way into one of many drain holes in the bottom of the pot. Went up 2 feet without any illumination/light. Having similar problem in my garden with Bermuda grass growing on the perimeter. Appears out of nowhere. Bermuda grass is hardier than most "weeds", and has multiple methods of spreading. St. Augustine will eventually crowd it out, but takes awhile. Dave
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Stop Messing Around & Re Turf Post the metres of turf you need & I will you price and Location
wrote:

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