Purple Nutsedge versus Zoysia

If purple nutsedge establishes itself in small spots of bare earth where there was no grass (for example, where a veggie garden used to be), how does this nutsedge fare against surrounding zoysia grass when the two meet? Which will win out over time?
In other words, will the purple nutsedge invade the surrounding zoysia and defeat the zoysia, or will the Meyer Zoysia grow into, strangle, and eventually eliminate the purple nutsedge?
That purple nutsedge is one tough weed, I fear. I've been pulling out its blades, but of course, folks here know it has underground tubers that remain in the ground unless dug up, and I haven't dug the tubers out because I don't want to harm the surrounding zoysia, so I'm just removing the blades and occasionally small parts of the sedge's rhizomes. But they say, this perennial weed's blades will just re-grow, so you'll have to pull out the blades 3 to 5 times before the tubers finally succumb and die. That's also what I've been doing with the dandelions in my side yard--repulling the blades everytime I see renewed blade growth.
But my question concerns unmolested Purple Nutsedge whose blades are left in tact, and not messed with. Over time, will healthy Purple Nutsedge win out over healthy ZoysiaGrass, or will the Zoysia win?
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On 11/13/2011 4:15 AM, ZoysiaSod wrote:

I am in the northern midwest, zone 5 and don't have a lot of experience with Zoysia, but I am a professional LCO and have only a couple of lawns with partial Zoysia. I find it goes dormant in late Sept, does survive drought better than ryes and blue grasses. Occasionally Nutsedge does pop up in the Zoysia and does seem to thrive. It grows the blade much faster than the Zoysia and reproduces through "nuts" under the turf. I don't know if it would completely overtake the Zoysia but do know that in my zone the Zoysia will not overtake the Nutsedge. The best thing I have found to control Nutsedge is Sledge Hammer by Gowan and can be purchased in a homeowner formula. It will need a spreader sticker and will need several applications to do the job. I have found that in mild infestations that if you pull it by the root, before June, that it can be eradicated because it hasn't had the chance to develop the "nut" yet.
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On Sun, 13 Nov 2011 18:39:16 -0600, zimpzampzormp wrote:

Thanks for your great information about the interaction between zoysia and nutsedge. It was very interesting.
I'm staying organic, so the Sledgehammer is out of the question in my yard, and I've been doing the pull-thing. I've pulled tons of purple nutsedge blades so very few are visible now, but I expect to be pulling more blades as they regrow in coming months. Hopefully the winter will slow the sedge down. Right now things are looking aesthetically pleasing in the yard with the sedge not visible.
Yellow nutsedge seems to be a lot easier to eradicate by pulling than purple nutsedge.
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Thanks for your great information about the interaction between zoysia
and nutsedge. It was very interesting.
I'm staying organic, so the Sledgehammer is out of the question in my yard, and I've been doing the pull-thing. I've pulled tons of purple nutsedge blades so very few are visible now, but I expect to be pulling more blades as they regrow in coming months. Hopefully the winter will slow the sedge down. Right now things are looking aesthetically pleasing in the yard with the sedge not visible.
Yellow nutsedge seems to be a lot easier to eradicate by pulling than purple nutsedge.
--
Rhea96


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