Property Screen

What can anyone recommend for a screen along one side of our property? I need about 250 ft of coverage. I thought about native cedars, that would not need any maintenance at all. The only thing is that it would take maybe 15 years for them to grow to the ten feet or so needed, I think. Transplanting wild trees of near that size would cost a fortune since I'm not physically able to do it.
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Hmmm, wonder if whether you live in Canada or Fl could be a factor?
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Can You install something You can live with till the cedars reach a good height? Then remove the screen fence..Just do'nt use concrete to set the posts and it will be a simple teardown later..Maybe buy the trees as large as You can afford to for the run and lessen the time the fence needs to be there. Just a thought. Dean
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Dean wrote:

Andy comments: I have used juniper virginianus (red cedar, in Texas) for many many years as a screen, and for decoration, as they grow wild all over and transplant easily if under 2 feet high. It takes about 5 years after transplanting to get to 8 feet high in Texas soils and weather. I have had very good luck with those I dug up in January, less so with other times of the year, but around here they are free so I do 5-10 at a time...
That being said, you might consider red tipped photinia, as they grow to about 12 feet ( In Texas soils) in around 5-6 years also, and don't continue to grow.
The cedar must be trimmed after reaching the proper height, and if you aren't able to transplant them yourself, you certainly won't be able to trim and prune a row of them. They will grow to 30 feet and spread out otherwise. Beautiful trees, but must be "managed" to do a hedge. I know from personally doing this. I am healthy, but don't look forward to the task much. Note that I am talking about juniper virginianus, and don't know your "local" name for them, and can't speak for any "other" cedars...... But they are a beautiful tree for decoration as you can "shape" them into shapes with your hedge clippers and make a very decorative yard..... providing you do this work about twice a year...
Why not put up a six foot fence and plant cucumbers ? <GGGG> ( Forget about kudzu, that's a bad idea <G> )
Good luck. I know you are impatient, but that's the way things usually work...
Maybe if you do a google on "fast growing trees" and "bushes privacy screens" you can come up with some good ideas for your area...
Oh.. one more thing.... Do NOT use arbor vitae. They do what you want, but are susceptible to complete decimation by bagworms. (in Texas ) Juniper virginianus are practically immune to this. Photinia get some sort of fungus/blight if you are unlucky, but you can probly spray for it......Spraying for bagworms only works BEFORE you see bags on the foliage. Those little buggers must be picked off by hand , IMMEDIATELY, or they will propagate all out of proportion. I've spent dozens of hours picking them off a decorative row of arbor vitae I had --- never again.
End of rambling on about gardeny stuff..\
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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wrote:

[snip]
250' all of one species is going to be boring, especially if you have all of the plants lined up in a row. If you only use a single species, you are vulnerable to losing everything at once (e.g., disease, or too much cold/heat/water/drought for the one species you plant). If you have several species not only will the screened area be more attractive, but you're not likely to lose everything at the same time. The right plant is going to depend upon where you're located, but you might consider clumps of birch, maple, crape myrtle, evergreens, flowering fruit trees, magnolias, etc. Also, consider planting them in a clump of three or five plants rather than in a single line, to give the landscape some depth and also better screening. In my area (central Florida), I would use three Bauhinia blakeana (Hong Kong Orchid), a couple of large citrus (pomelo, grapefruit, etc.), a clump of crape myrtle (even tho they'll be bare part of the year), a Royal Poinciana as a specimen tree, with one corner filled with Buddha Belly and/or Giant Timber bamboo or other clumping bamboo types. Any other open areas would have either red maple of live oak, with suitable understory plants (azaleas, osmanthus fragrans, day lilies, etc.)
In the south, consider including some clumping bamboos, which will provide an excellent screen without becoming invasive. Regards --
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