problem Willow

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[Top-posting fixed]
Loren via HomeKB.com said:

'Tis why I said it was "moot". But, you still haven't answered, as to my other points.
Is the deck screwed together, so that it could be partially disassembled, in order to grind out the stump?
Is the stump situated in a position, so that were you to remove it, you would be jeopardizing the integrity of the deck?

Yup, was no reason to explain. "Manure occurs." ;)
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The decking is screwed on but the joists are nailed. Taking the decking off woudl get me better access for drilling, but not allow a grinder. ALso withthe grinder - my house sits significantly above the street and alley. There is not ramp, driveway or hill to roll anything up - only stairs and retaining walls, so it woudl be difficult to get any type of serious grinder up there.
I have a picture, its not a great one, but if it possible to upload to this site and someone can tutor me how to do it, I would get it up for viewing.
Thanks
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Loren via HomeKB.com said:

Understood. Still, having as much access to the stump as possible will help, no matter the method you choose.

"Serious" grinders are self propelled. =)

As this isn't a binary group, it's best to not attach it to a message. Uploading it to one of the miriad of free web sites, and then posting the link to the pic here, would be the best way to go. If you're unsure where to look for one, entering "free image hosting" in your favorite search engine should get you started.
HTH
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Tree AND Internet knowledge. You people are amazing!
Here's the link
http://www.fotothing.com/Loren /
As it is now dark when I leave for work as well as when I get home, I wasn't able to get a good daylight picture of the stump. It is deceiving, but there is about 8 inches between the top of the stump and the bottom of the deck. And the stump is about halfway under the deck. There is about a three foot cantilever, so the stump is a good distance away fromt the footing.
What you see is about 5 weeks growth.
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Loren via HomeKB.com said:

What kind of Salix was this, again? I'm not sure you said. If you did, I can't find it. =(
If it were me, I think I'd still opt for removing the section of the deck that's over the stump, and remove it (the stump) properly (grinding). If you're careful, you shouldn't damage any of the joists, when removing/replacing them.
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Nice picture posting. If it were me I would probably pick off all of the new growth as it buds out of the stump until it finally gives up. This would mean doing it often. The idea is to not let it get this big, which is replenishing the roots with its sunlight generated food.
I know that this comment is about different plants, but I do this for big old multiflora stumps that I cut down and also wild grape vines. Both of these persist and I keep at them until they give up and rot out after a couple of years. If I had this problem I would use the same approach and see how it goes, expecting it to work eventually. Tomes
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How far under, and are there posts in the way?
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Taliban?
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wrote:

haha no ministry of environment. Use of a pesticide off label can be big big money up here.
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Hey all we need is N Korea to agree now! ha
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Mike said:

Same here. Wicked stuff.
Guess I really wanted to say, "Read the entire label, twice.". =)
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Loren wrote:

I found this:
the stump can be killed as follows: Bore holes at a slanting angle around the top of the stump. The holes should be about one and one-half inches in diameter and from eight to ten inches deep. Fill them with salt peter (nitrate of potash) or a commercial stump-killing product. The material will spread through the stump and prevent sucker growth from appearing. If the stump has green foliage growth on it now, you can apply a Blackberry Vine or Brush Killer to the foliage as a first step. Be sure this material does not touch any desirable vegetation, except the plant suckers you are trying to destroy. Read and follow label instructions.
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Just how are we drilling holes that size these days ?

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Srgnt Billko wrote:

Electric drill with a 1" auger bit. Willow is a soft wood anyway. I've drilled 1" holes in a 36" dia. Elm stump with a Ryobi 18 volt cordless. I had to change the batteries more than usual, but it worked.

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You can get a "speed-bore" bit at HD or Lowe's or any hardware store for 1 1/2". They work great in a 1/2" drill motor. If all you have is a 3/8" variable speed drill motor, begin by using a slower speed, then increase speed as you go deeper.
BTW, since the post has returned an abundance of votes for using RoundUp, why not save yourself a lot of money and use a product called, "Remuda", from Monterey Lawn & Garden. Here in San Diego, RoundUp costs $90 a gallon; Remuda costs $44.
When the patent ran out on Monsanto's formula, Monterey picked up the ball and made the same stuff. Sew the link below:
http://search.atomz.com/search/?sp-q=ramuda&sp-a 0711ee-sp00000002

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A. Pismo Clam said:

Yup. Spending the money on Roundup, because of the name, is foolish anymore. Look on the label for Glyphosate. (Check the strength, though. There are some weaker solutions, which will cost you more in the long run.)
Good advice. =)
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Piss watered round-up. whoopie.
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like others, i run a sapling war all year long with roundup. it doesnt really kill the stump to fast ,but eventually will (years) because if it cant have leaves it cant live. have long fence rows and find it easier to spray saplings when little rather than cutting them down when big. lucas
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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