Paving Stones over Concrete

I am planning on redoing my whole front yard, new grass, new walkway, and new driveway. I want to get rid of the fugly concrete driveway and walkway, replacing it with shaped paving stones, like the kind that interlock.
I'm going to tear out the existing walkway and place a new one one a different path.
For the driveway, I want paving stones, but if I can save myself a whole lot of work, I will.
I'd like to place the stones over the driveway, cutting out only a little of the concrete where it meets the sidewalk so it will slope down. I also want to raise everything a couple inches, which will make some of the other projects I have planned a little easier.
Is there a problem with this? I was thinking of cementing or otherwise attaching the paving stones to the slab. It's about 8' wide and 30' long.
Thanks!
CS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Paving stones are usually just set down on a sand base and then either sand of stone dust is brushed over. Beneath the sand layer you need a stabilized base. That could be just the existing ground material, if it's just gravel and firm enough. If it's soft soil, then it needs to be removed down far enough to get to firm material, then suitable material added and compacted, prior to putting the sand down.
If the concrete you have is stable, then it could be OK from a support standpoint as the base and you could go with the sand on top. However, the concern I would have is drainage. If the concrete is slab is intact, water won't be able to drain out effectively and it could be a problem with freeze/ thaw cycles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message
<snip> Paving stones are usually just set down on a sand base and then either sand of stone dust is brushed over. Beneath the sand layer you need a stabilized base. That could be just the existing ground material, if it's just gravel and firm enough. If it's soft soil, then it needs to be removed down far enough to get to firm material, then suitable material added and compacted, prior to putting the sand down.
If the concrete you have is stable, then it could be OK from a support standpoint as the base and you could go with the sand on top. However, the concern I would have is drainage. If the concrete is slab is intact, water won't be able to drain out effectively and it could be a problem with freeze/ thaw cycles.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I'm near Los Angeles, so freeze/thaw cycles aren't a problem.
What would be the best way to attach them to the concrete? Or, should I just lay them down and install solid borders to keep them from moving?
Thanks!
CS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

glegroups.com...
Per my earlier post, pavers are not typically attached to anything. They are set on a sand base, which is put down on a firm sub-base of somekind. In your case, the concrete would be the base.
Even with no freeze thaw cycles I'd consider where rain water is going to go. If the driveway is pitched and you do it right, should not be an issue. But if you have any low spot, with solid concrete underneath, water would have no place to go and could take a while for it to evaporate. That's the only issue that would be different about your install vs any other paver install.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
' snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net[_2_ Wrote: > ;925825']On Jun 5, 2:51*pm, "CS" snipped-for-privacy@sears.com wrote:-

> and

> walkway,

> whole lot

> little of

> want

> otherwise

> long.

bed with sharp sand then there is every chance weeds will fill the voids. Ideally you need to dig down 200mm (8") Lay 100mm hardcore and compact with a whacker plate. Then spread the sharp sand. The sand will need to be approx 10mm above the required level ninus the thicknes of the slab. You will need to whack so you can walk on it without leaving foot prints. Once you have completed this stage you can lay your slabs. Using a very light rake fluff the very top of the sand, this will allow you to rubber mallet the slabs to their required level. Honestly this is the only true solution. Remember you get what you paid for where labour is also cost.
--
Robby1


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.