Old gasoline

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snipped-for-privacy@snail-mail.net writes:

Currently... no. But you're dealing with a 35 year old blower!
-- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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I have one dated to 1980 and it has a breather - yours should too.
-- PDQ
--
| I bought a 1970 (approx) vintage Toro Snowhound 20. | | No air cleaner at all? Not even a screen to keep mice out in the | summer? Is this normal for the industry? |
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Yeah its normal. Ariens snowkings dont have one by default. You can buy one from them though if you really want it. Only thing that covers the carb is a metal enclosure around it. Its open from the bottom though.
Tom
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Yep! I did small engine work for a few years, never saw a filter, screen or anything on the carburetor intake. My guess is it would just get clogged with snow anyway! Neither my twenty year old Bolens or my two year old Toro have anything for a intake filter. Greg
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wrote:

I have an 8-year-old MTD snowblower with a Techumsa engine and it doesn't have an air filter either.
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JUst think: You can use your snow thrower to shoot mouse parts at your hated neighbors.
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Don't you write horror movies?
"Night of the flying mouse parts.... hide under the bed and breathe through the sheets"
--

Christopher A. Young
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snipped-for-privacy@snail-mail.net wrote:

It's normal NOT to have an air cleaner for both current models of Briggs and Stratton Snow engines as well as Tecumseh Snow King. I think the rational is that it would likely get clogged with snow/moisture/ice and it's not necessary since the air is remarkedly dust free when everything is covered with fresh snow.
That's fine but I like to run my engine during the off season every few months, and I don't like the idea of doing so without the cleaner, so I don't run it for very long and try to do so after it rains. There isn't any room for an air cleaner underneath the snow hood on my B&S Snow engine, other than that I could probably just get an air cleaner from a non-snow Intek engine. Anybody else have any ideas?
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wrote:

I would not worry about it, unless you run the engine during sand storms! I run mine a few times a summer too. I doubt that there is enough dirt in the air to cause a problem running a few minutes during the summer. Greg
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Yes. During the witner, all the dirt and dust is covered by snow. Not a problem like summer time when you're whomping up the dust with a lawn mower.
--

Christopher A. Young
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snipped-for-privacy@snail-mail.net wrote:

You don't need one. It doesn't run long enough to worry about it and it's not like a mower kicking up dust and such.
It takes a long time to draw in enough debris to cause engine damage. These old engines will also run on a quite a bit of engine wear before there is a problem. Most of the time it is only a fouled plug. The engines often outlast the blower anyway.
Kirb
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Retired Navy guy here. When we went on those 6 or more extended tours on a ship, I put my car in storage. I learned the hard way, the gas don't keep that long. 2 things happen. Water forms in the tank from hot/cold cycles from the weather, and the gas breaks down at the chemical level. The car may or may not start upon my arrival home from a 6 or more month tour. If it did run, it ran roughly. Putting "dry gas" additive in the tank helps before storing gasoline that long, but its not perfect still at the end of the time period. Filling the tank reduces the air in the tank, and any corresponding water intrusion as a result. Gas stations that don't do much business should be avoided as these are most likely to have water in their storage tanks. Gasoline will, after stored extensively, turn into a very sloppy, very loose gelatenous mass that no internal combustion engine should ever see, diluted in "good" gas or not.
Other than killing weeds on the fenceline, there's another garden use. If your tomatoes/potato crop location has that contagion that requires at least two years of non-growth to allow the contagion to run its course, then pour the gas in the area. 2 years later, and alls good irregardless.
--
Lil' Dave
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news:001cf.5745

garden use. If

requires at least

course, then pour

irregardless.
If you'd eat vegetables grown where gasoline was dumped, MBTE and all, you are a far more "trusting" man than I.
Bob
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wrote in message

Why? Edible foods are grown in soil with fertilizers derived from petroleum, or some form of manure everyday. The only difference here between petroleum derived fertilizer and this is that am not paying for it. Mother nature is doing the chemical breakdown of the petroleum product. Just because its not a common practice, doesn't mean its not viable.
Anyone who's done backyard location car work for years in a location in the backyard, then abandoned that location has seen the results from the oil and gasoline waste. Similar to the grass growing greener over a leaky septic tank or leech field. Fenceline waste oil dumping is the same. Takes a couple of years to recover, but the results are the same.
--
Lil' Dave
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wrote in message

Since you know this to be true, please provide us with the chemical formulas of how gasoline and it's additives become fertilizer.

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wrote in message

another
that
its
derived from

difference here

not paying for it.
"Derived from" is not "the same as". And they don't put MTBE in fertilizer. Maybe some plants may grow OK years after such contamination, but that doesn't mean they are good for me to eat. For you, maybe?
Bob
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Tomatos grown in gasoline soaked ground... Hummmm!!!
You could always mix it up with fresh two cycle gas a little at a time. No valves to get stuck. Might run a bit crappy though.
I would again mix it either with fresh gas and run it in a lawnmower or
snowblower.
OR
Use it as a nice good weedkiller. Just pour it in small amounts. Enough to kill the grass but not enough to soak in a do some soil damage. You might be even able to use it in a spray bottle to kill the weeds....
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On 9 Nov 2005 12:24:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Where do you think fried tomatoes come from?

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2005 01:57:59 GMT, "FDR"

Only two gallons of just one year old gas? Dump it into your car's gas tank and get new gas for the mower. The gas is not that old in the first place and there's not enough of it to cause a problem to your auto in the second place. Please don't dump it on the ground or use it for weed killer, as this is environmentally damaging. In my state, it's illegal. People get caught and fined for doing it.
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snipped-for-privacy@xxoptonline.net (Tom Miller) wrote:

Exactly right!
Please -do not- dump fossil fuel on the ground, you can add that much to your car tank and never notice a difference in performance.....if you dump that much on the ground, you will kill everything in the soil that's close by -and- some fish in your nearest body of water.
Use it up first next year you bogart! :)
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