no grass over septic tank

Noticed my septic tank in Pacific Northwest will not grow grass over it. I dug out all the overlying dirt to investigate, but other than some chunky rocks (not the cause of the bare area, but certainly not helping either) and moist dirt directly atop the tank, I am at a loss.
Is it possible that the exhaust from the tank is noxious to the grass? Seems odd to me b/c I thought plants thrived when exposed to such an environment.
Thoughts on the cause and suggestions on what to do to get the grass growing for once? Any special dirt treatment? tia bob
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here in NJ grass loves growing over septic tanks , but septic tank in Pacific Northwest may have some thing in moist overlying dirt may react with septic tank water Or is there just too much water over the septic tank and the grass is under tomuch stress. rich brandstetter

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How far underground is the tank? If the grass isn't growing above the lid of the tank maybe the top of the lid is only a few inches under the ground and the grass doesn't get a good root system going there??? Just a thought. I agree with a previous post the leach field should take away all water and gas and if it doesn't then it would show up in your basement.IMHO

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When installed, the installers took the soil that came out of the hole and used it as topsoil.
I'd dig out the area in question a few inches and get rid of that soil, and get some fresh loam.
------------------------- www.askalandscaper.com

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When you replace the soil over the septic tank, mix in a large bag of peat moss so that it will hold more water in the soil.
Also, if the thing still browns out over the septic tank because the tank is not set low enough, and the peat moss does not help, you can always go to plan B which is to actually build up the soil a little and make a small flower bed right over the tank. That way you can add another foot of soil and instead of groaning about the browned out area can plant a bed of ornamental grass or something. Just put a little stake or something in the soil so that you always locate the opening to the tank when you need to have it pumped. It makes no difference whatsoever in the scheme of things if you have to just dig down a bit more to get to the tank cover opening, and if you had to disturb a piece of sod with some perennials planted in it, then just do that and put them back in. It only takes an extra three minutes.
Dennis
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