My Poor Lawn

Hi everyone thanks for reading, i joined this site because im having a few problems with my lawn!
I have enclosed a picture for you to see the problems, i have terrible yellow patches from our puppy (i now dont let him in the back garden) and down the left hand side of our fence and back of the fence the garden has just died altogether, im wanting some advice on the best method of salvaging the lawn, it was turfed around 4months ago and never really looked healthy since, i think alot of this may be down to me living on a new build housing estate as most of the lawns are pretty poor but ours is just terrible.
I have hired a gardening company to come 3 times a year to fertilise the lawn by injecting it or something (sorry i know nothing at all about gardening!) and im hoping that may solve our problem but im wanting a little advice on things i could do to help growth of the lawn,
Thanks for reading.
http://tinyurl.com/yc7o6ut
(the lawn actually looks alot better on the picture than it does in real life you cant see all the mud patches)
--
Pooryellowgrass

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Pooryellowgrass wrote:

Why are you asking now, in February, when the night-time temperature in Leeds (UK) is going to be -3 tonight, and you barely hit the freezing point during the day.
You put down sod in November and expect it to look good right now?
Where are your brains?
There's something called WINTER happening right now, and it generally makes most plant life LOOK LIKE SHIT until it's over.

You have more money than brains - that much is clear.
And why are you posting to usenet via the lame and spammy web interface known as a "banter" site?

Wait until spring. How's that for advice?
What do you think you can do right now?
Do you think watering the lawn is going to help RIGHT NOW?
Do you think that spreading fertilizer or grass seed is going to help RIGHT NOW?
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Lawn Guy;878727 Wrote:

I am asking now because i want to be prepared when it is time to sor the grass out.

no i didnt put it down the house builder contracted a gardener to pu the turf down.
My Brains??I am not a gardener a lawn is just a By-product of my house I hold a 2.1 Degree in Business Management and im sure my job as conversion cell manager is more lucrative than being a "lawn guy" bu that is irrelevant.

More money than Brains?? I did not purchase the turf as I mentione earlier the building manufacturer Charles Church must have no Brain as do the company that turfed the lawn, if a company gives you a dat they are going to lay your lawn and they get an independent gardenin company to carry out the work who am I to argue?

I googled Lawn advice message board and this was the first site tha popped up so i registered and asked for advice, i am not someone wh spends hours on end online living my life through different we applications, If using this message board as i have is not recommende then why is it the number one search result on Google with no warning to use the site Via "usenet"?

Thankyou for your one line of constructive advice
I do not know what i can do right now thats why i have posted on her obviously!
How would i know if spreading fertilizer is going to help right now? dont know if there are any winter treatments available.
I am perplexed that you think everyone in the world is as obsessed a you with lawns and gardens there are a reason people employ gardeners a they see them as to time consuming, I am 29 not 64 i have a ver stressful time consuming job and the garden is the least of my concerns i have 10 mins free to deal with the garden and ask for advice and i ge a typical arrogant "keyboard warrior" speaking to me like shite.
So thanks "Lawn Guy" and i hope in time you realise there is more t peoples worlds than the internet and there Lawns! There is a whole worl out there beyond your garden and computer monitor
--
Pooryellowgrass


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On Mar 1, 3:10pm, Pooryellowgrass <Pooryellowgrass.

Some simple things.
First, a good portion of that damage appears to be from the dog.
Second, God only knows what kind of soil you have. Builders, at least here in the states, are not known for leaving you with 6 inches of good topsoil. Yet, that topsoil is the most important element. You can spend years on seed, sod, fertilizer, chemicals and water and still not have a decent lawn if you're trying to grow it on rocks and gravel. So, first thing, go take a spade, cut some squares, lift back the sod and see what kind of soil you have. If you don't have at least 4 inches of good topsoil, your best alternative for long term success may be to start over. That would be especially true if the area is small. For a small area it wouldn't cost much to get good screened topsoil or alternatively perhaps some good compost, manure, etc and till it in.
Here in the states, in many areas, there are county agricultural service offices that will analyze soil for you, look at grass samples you bring in, and give advice. Try to find a local place that can analyze the soil for you and tell you what if anything it needs. For example, it's common for trucked in topsoil on a build site to have a PH that needs to be adjusted.
And at this point there isn't too much you can do since it's winter. You should find out what kind of sod was laid down so you can get some appropriate seed of the same type to re-seed the bare spots in early Spring, assuming you're gonna go with what's there. I'd also look into neighbors that have nice lawns, garden clubs, etc as you may be able to find someone there to give you advice or a recommendation to competent pros.
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