Murray cultivator

Hi...
Wonder if anyone happens to have knowledge of these Murray cultivators... small 2 cycle engine, perhaps 30 or 40 cc things?
I bought one for a small garden (10 x 15 feet'ish) at the lake. Durned thing bounces across the top really well, takes forever and a lot of coaxing to get it to dig down even a few inches.
Studied the manual, made sure that tines were right way, etc.
Noticed that the manual warned me that the tines were self-sharpening and that I had to be careful to not cut myself. Something wrong here, 'cause I'm not sure they'd cut through warm butter! :)
Should mention, brand new. And the "cutting" edge is just flat steel, no edge at all.
So, the question, if I may? Should I sharpen them? Have them sharpened? Or wait for them to "self-sharpen"? Or throw it away! :(
Thanks in advance, and take care.
Ken
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Borrow (rent) a real tiller and when you have the ground worked up you can use the small one to keep it that way. My wife bought me one of the 'toys' and it did the same thing. After about two years the motor section broke off. Probably only used it 10 times. It would have been less expensive to have rented a tiller for the number of times I actually used it before it fell apart.
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Not sure what you have but if it is like the "Mantis 20# tiller" (there are now many similar) they do better if you drag them backwards rather than try to walk them forward like a normal tiller. I have a Toro (had a Mantis) and they do bounce but they are very handy and when you get used to handling them you can get close to plants to cultivate very nicely. No tiller (big or small) is as simple to use as they appear in TV ads.
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Ken Weitzel wrote:

Are you trying to break new ground? Those cultivators do a pretty good job in an existing garden. They do not break new ground at all. You might want to rent a tiller to get the beds established and then use the cultivator yearly to turn things over.
Sharp doesn't really make a difference.
--
Art

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I am not familiar with the Murray, but I have a 1.5hp Craftsman about the same size as the Mantis. I got it used and It did not seem to cut as good as a Mantis that I had tried. I checked the rpm and it was governed at 6000. I set it up to the recommended 7600rpm and it does good. I have a Troy 5hp and a front end 3hp tiller. If the ground was broken up by a larger machine before planting, these little fellas do a great job at cultivating. You mentioned that the blades had a blunt edge, no they will never sharpen themselves. Take a close look again and see if the back side of the blades are ground to an edge. If so, remoe the tines and reinstall the ones removed from one side to the opposite side and visa/versa Ken Weitzel wrote:

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-major snippage of good advice-
So in other words you're saying those electric portable tillers ain't so bad?
I've been thinking about buying one for small cultavation chores close to the house, but I've never tried one out yet. Good to go for what it's worth? (not expecting too much with a plug on it... besides winding up the extension cord in the tines)
Of course. hehe
--
I went back to the store
They gave me four more
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Ken, If you purchased it new, I would take it back and get the Mantis . They are a little more expensive but my wife loves hers . I do use the big tiller in the spring and then she cultivates/weeds the garden though out crop season with the Mantis . Just my .02, Raz
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