moss

I have moss lots of it, but the front yard is the part I'm concerned about, it's like shag carpet! anything I should do besides lime the crap out of it? I know drainage is a cause too but I think it drains OK, I am surrounded by pine trees also I suppose I could have it removed and put turf down but I'm CHEAP. Clarkky...
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On Wed, 31 Mar 2010 19:27:48 -0400, Clarkky...

Lawn sand, £5 from B & Q, does 135mts. Have to rake it after ten days or so.
MO Bacter, £35 from classic-lawns.co.uk, does 200 mts. No raking (^_^)
Steven
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I think you all need to buy some weed killer.That should take care of all problems
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wrote:

I think you all need to buy some weed killer.That should take care of all problems
and then I can water my dirt every couple days, LOL.. Clarkky...
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Clarkky... wrote the following:

The only thing that grows under pine trees is moss, or an acidic loving groundcover. The third option is mulch. Grass seed won't grow and sod may not take root and will die. Google - grass under pine trees
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Actually directly under my pines is just about nothing, these pines are 100 ft tall and I have tried acid loving plants, they are dying slowly... but the lawn is not directly under those trees, the trees I have on the frontage of the property is Birch and Maples.
Clarkky...
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willshak said:

Nope. We've plenty of grass growing under pines. Keep the needles raked up, and adjust the pH accordingly (lime like hell should do it).
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Eggs

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Hey Eggs, Do you actually check the PH or "wing" it? most of the moss is not directly under the trees but it is in the general direction of the rain runoff I can picture myself having to buy a pallet of lime, my front "yard" is 247' X 80' Clarkky...
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Clarkky... said:

Check it, d00d. Home test kits are cheap, or you can take several samples from an area of the yard, and take them to your local co-op. They'll give you the results (probably for a nominal fee), telling you exactly what to put down, and what quantities.
Won't do much long-term good if you don't keep up with the removal of the pine straw.

Yup. It just might take that much, *if* you have to treat the whole yard. The whole yard might not need it, though. Break the yard up into areas, take samples from each area, combine the samples from each specific area in a baggie, and take it to get tested. That's definately got to be the first thing you do. There's no sense in guessing what you need in your yard, when the facilities are available to tell you exactly what you need. ;)
I'd get the testing done pretty soon, also. The optimal time to apply lime is the fall. EARLY spring works, but the sooner, the better. And, keep in mind that it's not a permanent fix. If you can bring the pH to 6.5, *and* you keep up with the pine straw removal diligently, you can expect to repeat the treatment every 4-5 years. So, the cost factor goes up. It's all in how bad you really want a lawn that will compete with your pine trees.
If it were me, I'd plant shrubs, ferns, and other plants that thrive in high-acid environments. You'd have the potential to have a pretty cool yard which doesn't necessarily have to contain a large "lawn" area. Designate certain, smaller sections to turf (which will be easier on the wallet), and make other areas landscape beds with appropriate plantings (and maybe hardscape features (rocks, boulders, a dry creek, etc). Something to think about. =)
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Eggs

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Eggs Zachtly wrote:

I will take pic's ugh I think only grass will look right, and Egg's just for you I load OE quote fix on this PC, (I had forgotten about it)
Clarkky...
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