Light sensor for OFF at dusk and ON at daylight?

I'm interested in finding a light sensor/110V outlet combination that turns things off at dusk an on at daylight, instead of the other way around as most of them do. Can anyone suggest where to get such a thing, or where else I can ask about it?
Thanks for any help! David
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I have never heard anyone who wanted that. I doubt that anyone makes a standard product for it (at any reasonable price). The easiest way to get that would be to buy a standard one and put a relay after it to invert the output.

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dh@. wrote the following:

I suppose you would have to rewire the light sensor so it works in reverse.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Oct 17, 11:05 pm, dh@. wrote:

You could use two light sensors in a box (with ventilation!). The first looks at the world while the second looks at the light on the first sensor.
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discussion : snipped-for-privacy@g13g2000yqj.googlegroups.com...

Just put a 110 volt realy at the place of the lamp connection in a simple dusk detector and use a N.C. connection on it to feed what ever you want.. if the relay is OFF (when the detector see some light) the currenty pass .. simple simple simple..
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wrote:

That idea worked great. It's probably the way I'll go with it

I'm interested in trying that but don't know an easy place to get the relay, or what an N.C. connection is. I did however get two light sensors like "Stubby" suggested and it seems to work pretty well.
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On 10/26/2010 7:38 AM, dh@. wrote:

parts-express.com has relays for many different voltages. A 120 volt relay is about $10.00. The N.C. connection is the "normally closed" connection. It is a closed circuit before the relay is activated. It opens upon activation. The opposite is the normally open connection which is the opposite of the normally closed.
The relay is small, does not require much power (none when it is not activated). It doesn't put out heat, and it is easy to wire into a circuit. It does seem like a better choice than the two light suggestion.
--
Jim

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wrote:

I might eventually try it, but I've been trying out the two sensor approach for several days now and it seems to be working great. I plan to replace the incandescent nightlight I'm using with an LED light, and may just leave it at that.
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snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...

110 volt relay are very easy to find.. look there http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId 49721&numProdsPerPage` you will even see the base for it on the same page.. http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId 62476&clickid=prod_cs
the schematics of the connection inside the relay is on the top of the plastic cover.. very easy to work with..
And a N.C. connection is a NORMAL CLOSED connection, so the part of a switch that normally (without power to the relay) is normal a closed circuit.. (passing current)
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What are you using it for? Could a timer work instead?. Just curious, I might learn something.
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On Sun, 31 Oct 2010 07:20:22 -0500, "Dr.Smith"

I'm using it to light a bird cage. I wanted the lights to go along pretty much with day and night cycles for the area we are in, and was going to use timers and change the settings every couple of weeks or whatever, but even if I got that going smoothly a power failure would mess things up. So the idea of letting the sun do it since that's what I'm trying to simulate seemed like the best way to go, and still does.
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