Lawn Tractors/Mowers

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wrote:

Why snip out the pertinent part of your reply that stated you only need one gear as thats all thats used anyhow.....that was the point being made.............Just because your in the dark on how a hydrostatic tranny works as compared to mechanical drive trannys and too cheap to have one, why knock em...........There is absolutely no advantage a gear drive in a L & G tractor has over a hydro drive.........hands down its the better , no, BEST way to go.....Has all the power at low speeds as well as high all with just pushing the pedal down...........simple enough for even you to operate......I hope! Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Roy) wrote:

It is only better if you use it. Many people such as myself can do a job in one gear and wouldn't use the hydromatic lever other than to start and stop. It would be a big waste of money and maintenance time. I would think that a person that thought they were frugal would not advise people to buy something they aren't going to use.
Tractors with front-end loaders and back-hoes are better also, but I don't need one. Tractors with 6 cylinder engines are better, but I don't need one. Tractors with hydromatic transmissions are better, but I don't need one.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Roy) wrote:

In the manual for the John Deere OMM149664, Issue L3 Lawn Tractors LX280, LX280AWS, and LX289 PIN, automatic transmission tractors it specifically says:
"Do not use cruise control when going down hills. Machine speed will increase."
That means you have to keep your foot on the "forward pedal" like a throttle when going down hills.
With a gear-shift transmission you go up and down hill without touching any levers or pedals. Their speed doesn't increase going down hills. They are much safer.
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S. M. Henning wrote:

lift my foot off the pedal going downhill.

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Are you saying that John Deere manual does not describe operation of Murray tractors? You are correct. But I doubt that John Deere is wrong, they are talking about their own tractors.
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S. M. Henning wrote:

I'm sorry. I was referring to hydrostatic operation while going downhill. My comment was not about cruise control (which I do not have), but about hydrostatic operation when going downhill. But you would know much better about hydrostatic transmissions and cruise control since you own neither. I deleted that message and composed another, if you would care to comment on that one.
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wrote:

little you know or can conceive regarding hydrostatic drives.........Mr. One speed one gear manual clutch flat lander! Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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wrote:

As does my GX335 as soon as I let off the go pedal it slows and stops...........but just think if you had a manual you cold keep on coasting and save fuel! I sure don;t know where S.M H, gets his info or how he cyphers out what he reads but he needs to put a brighter light bulb in his reading lamp.............and get up to date on hydrostatic drives and garden tractors.
Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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S. M. Henning wrote:

control on my hydrostatic tractor and it actually brakes when going down hill, as long as I take my foot off the pedal.

pedal, or is that not mentioned? In a car, the brake pedal will disengage the cruise control, does that not happen with a tractor. I don't have cruise control, so you will have to enlighten me. I'll take your expertise opinion on this.

pre-conceived assumption? After all, as you said, you have a lawn as flat as a billiard table, never have to back up, and use only a single forward gear, so how would you know about hills, braking, and backing up?
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wrote:

He is just grabbing at straws randomly, and the post is getting so far off its original matter, mainly due to the fact of S.M.H's ignorance in the operation of a hydrostatic, and his wealth of misinformation!

Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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Roy wrote:

I know. I'm just letting him dig a bigger hole. At some point, we will never hear from him again, or he will say that it's not so bad down here in the hole, or he will ask for help getting out of the hole. I'm having fun, you?

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wrote:

What the hell does cruise control have to do with a hydrostatic being worse or better than a gear model......seems like your grabing staws that are totally irrevelant to the original posts concerning the hydrostatic drives............
And I suppose a manual shift tranny with cruise will not gain any additional speed either.....duh! Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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Roy wrote:

Methinks that Hemmings knowledge of lawn tractors is limited to those which he owns, as well as as the lawns of which he is familiar with. There can be no other variations.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Roy) wrote:

Garden tractors 101:
First, all power created on gas garden tractors is created by 2 things: 1) change in elevation such as going up or down hills 2) the gasoline engine
Second, the gasoline engines are designed to operate at constant speeds determined by two things: 1) the governor on the engine 2) the tension the throttle lever applies to the governor-spring.
Third, three things determine the speed of a tractor: 1) the speed of the engine 2) the gear ratio of the transaxle 3) the drive tire diameter
Fourth, there are two types of transaxles: 1) mechanical 2) hydrostatic
Either type of transaxle just ratios of the number of revolutions of the engine to the number of revolutions of the rear wheels, nothing more and nothing less. However, in doing so the torque available to the rear wheels is changed, but all power comes from the engine and the torque is determined by the ratio and not the type of unit. Hydrostatic units have more power loss due to more heat generation.
The advantage of the mechanical is that the ratios are predetermined by the gears and are reproducible.
The advantage of the hydrostatic is that the ratio is infinitely variable.
They hydrostatic usually costs more and is sometimes called automatic, but it isn't automatic. It usually has forward and reverse pedals and usually a cruise lever. The mechanical transmission has a clutch and a shift lever.
People who use automatic transmissions usually like the fact the hydrostatic transaxles don't have a clutch.
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S. M. Henning wrote:
[BS snipped]
My God, can you at least buy a clue?
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This one was fun to read! Keep it up guys.

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snipped-for-privacy@TAKETHISOUTmail.utexas.edu says...

The clutch and gear transmission type are not as bad as you might think. Yes you have to stop, shift, back up and turn, stop, shift, etc. You get used to it after awhile if the ergonomics aren't too bad. You need the durability of gears if you are going to be pulling heavy stuff around regularly, but the "automatics" are nice if you are going to use it just for mowing or maybe drag a little utility cart around.
I don't entirely like the term "automatic" as applied here. I guess it's a sales thing, and who can understand the murky workings of their minds ;-)
The best, IMO, is hydrostatic. These use a variable displacement hydraulic pump driven by the engine and a hydraulic motor geared to the wheels. The pump displacement control usually connects to a single lever or pedal which gives you continuous range from forward thru stop thru reverse. Usually so reliable you could just drive it for years with no attention at all, although transmission fluid and maybe a filter should be freshened up at relatively long service intervals, and are easy to do.
Some of the cheapos use another approach with variable width v-belt pulleys to get adjustable drive speed. These work well enough new, but get "funny" with age as the belts wear valleys in the pulley faces. Most implementations have an in-line "shifter" with notches. It is also possible with two belts or with a belt and gear combination to get a single pedal or lever with continuous range from forward to reverse, but that's more engineering and most of them don't bother since they are designing for low price. The belts wear out and have to be replaced, and are usually not very easy to do. Some even call it a hydra-something-or-other drive to make you think you are getting a hydrostat, when in reality it is something else not nearly as good.
Caveat emptor, you get what you pay for, etc.
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I would have to dissagree on needing gears if you pull heavy loads. I would be hard pressed to believe the gears in most typical L & G tractors are all that much stonger than a good hydrostatic drive unit. MOst consumer type L & G tractors are offered as baaaseline units with minimal everything be it gears or hydrostatic drives. I had a JD317 with over 4000 hours on it when I finally got rid of it, and it was a hydrastatic drive, and it was used hard and put up wet all the time, and it was used to pull more than what it should have all the time. I used to drag around a trailer full of firewood that weighted about 5 or 6000 pounds. It was used for ground tillage and breaking in the garden I had back then, 1 1/2 acres and it never missed a beat.
I now have a JD GX335 with hydro and its just as good as the 317 was..You do not need gears to pull things with and they certainly do not make it any more efficient or stronger. The JD lineup of the L series is built for light pulling loads as are most other similar units.
Nnnothing could be easier and more trouble free than the layout JD uses with their twin touch pedals. Throttle it up and go.......push harder on the pedal you have ore speed and torque. No need to come to a complete stop before hitting the reverse pedal either, so cycle time and fuction is a lot quicker with a hydrastatic drive with twin pedals than anay setup using strictly gears can even think about being. More andmore heavy dury industrial equipment is being suypplied with hydrostatic drives each year. Its a proven fact they are just as strong when it comes to use and pulling with and will last just as long. Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wife, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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Roy (and anyone else),
The tiller for your JD317 was belt driven was it not? I'd heard that there were problems with belt driven tillers. The local JD salesman where I live said he rarely sells them. I'm looking at an JD LX 280. Would this model with tiller do a good job breaking ground and keeping a garden tilled, in your opinion?
Thanks.

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Ol' Duffer wrote:

cart around, like a 4' W by 5' L with 1' H sides, and golf cart wheels, carrying dirt filled to the top of the rails. I have a ball hitch installed on the back of my tractor to pull the cart. The only problem towing it up some grades when full is that the drive wheels sometimes skid on the grass. My set of wheel chains helps in those instances. Also, I have a 48" snow blower attachment that weighs a couple of hundred pounds and requires that I weigh down the back of the tractor with wheel weights and a US Military GI can, filled with water, strapped to the back of the tractor. My driveway is sloped and I have no problem snowblowing while driving uphill. Did I mention that the tractor was 10 years old?

is no filter.

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