Lawn membranes??

Afternoon everyone....
I've spent the last two days digging up my garden to get rid of th enormous amount of weeds and rocks which i've now pretty much done. M initial intention was to sow grass seeds to grow my lawn back but don't think this is an option due to the state the garden is in. I wa wondering if there was a membrane that could be used so i could la this out and then put the turf on top? I've had a look at a couple o web-sites that only seem to sell membranes suitable for flower beds shrubberies etc etc. Has anyone any ideas? Thanks Ji
-- jim123
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Black plastic film will work. Lanscape fabric is awful because weeds, including crabgrass, will come up through it.
wrote:

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'Stubby[_2_ Wrote:

Thanks for the tips, much appreciated.
Not wanting to sound like a complete idiot.....black plastic film....i this a specialist thing i'll find in garden centres or are we jus talking bin liners here??
Thanks again...
-- jim123
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wrote:

I've been watching this thread and finally had to respond --
1. Putting an impermeable plastic down under sod is a really bad idea. It's not going to keep weeds out of your yard and it will interfere with the normal growth of the sod. Water will run off and things will heat up and dry out almost immediately, and you either won't have enough soil below the turf to keep the grass alive or you'll have enough to allow weeds to grow -- plus lots of other reasons. Don't do it.
2. If you MUST use a weed-stop fabric, make it a permeable one -- BUT -- I haven't talked to anyone who used a weedstop fabric who, over the long term, liked the results. There are two reasons (or more). (1) Whenever you want to dig a hole, plant a tree or shrub, etc., the damn fabric is in the way and you have to get a knife or scissors and cut out your planting area. It's a pain. and (2) It doesn't do much good. Although it keeps weeds from growing up through the fabric, many/most of the weeds start at the surface or above the level of the fabric and grow DOWN into the subsurface. If grass will grow, so will weeds. Wind / birds / animals / clothing / weather will bring weed seeds into the yard.
The best way to keep weeds out of your turfgrass is to grow a very good, tightly knot turf that overpowers any weeds that try to get started. Weed stop fabric is a waste of time and money, now and later.
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Yes, I couldn't figure out what exactly he was trying to do either. "I've spent the last two days digging up my garden to get rid of the enormous amount of weeds and rocks which i've now pretty much done. My initial intention was to sow grass seeds to grow my lawn back but i don't think this is an option due to the state the garden is in. I was wondering if there was a membrane that could be used so i could lay this out and then put the turf on top? "
Makes no sense to me. What exactly is the remaining problem with the area where the lawn is to go? It would also be hepful to know where the lawn is located, as what to do in Florida can be very different with what to do in the UK. But for sure trying to lay sod or grow a lawn on top of a plastic barrier is the wrong thing to do. That's why you can't find them shown or recommended for that application. Also, if you're talking about cool season grass and seeding, summer is the wrong time to be doing it. Wait until Sept.

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> haven't talked to anyone who used a weedstop fabric who, over the long te=
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> liked the results. =A0There are two reasons (or more). =A0(1) Whenever yo=
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Stubby wrote:

Andy adds:
I have used both black plastic and landscape fabric, and observed the results for many years. Stubby is correct.
My best results were black plastic with gravel over it for at least two inches. This protects the black plastic from sunlight, which will degrade it in one or two years. With gravel over it, after 20 years it is still intact. Gravel doesn't blow away. And with two inches, you can walk on it without tearing up the plastic underneath.... I like the small pink gravel, but I have also used the large white rock....
Regarding the soil underneath ----- With black plastic, you get the same effect as if you put down a concrete slab, or a concrete or asphalt driveway. The soil underneath remains stable, and does NOT dry out. In fact, it stays more stable since most of the "drying out" would occur from evaporation from the surface, and that is virtually eliminated. Same thing as happens in roadways and parking lots. Things are better. The soil moisture difufuses IN from the sides and causes problems only at the edges, such as the edge of a foundation of a house...... Underneath is no problem. However, bugs and ants can live underneath. Also gardening sites warn about fungus. I have seen bugs -- I haven't seen fungus.
Regarding weeds. All that has been posted here by the other posters about weeds growing in landscape fabric is true......
Presently, I use black, 4 or 6 mil black plastic to block off the big areas. I cover it with gravel. Or mulch, if I don't mind replacing it a couple times a year since it washes and blows away.
If I want a bush, I remove the gravel and plastic for, say a two or three foot circle. Dig the hole, put in some compost, put in the bush and then put landscape fabric to cover the hole. That way I can water the bush effectively until it recovers, and the rain will have a place to run in under the plastic. I have had very little weed growth in these small areas. Apparently the bush takes the nutrients before the weeds, but I'm not sure ----- it just isn't much of a problem.
The area is North Texas , where the summers are always in drought and the winter and spring is usually pretty wet. The soil is mostly clay, and the temps are above 100 in summer and almost never go below 32F at any time..... That stuff is probly important, tho you can get more thorough advice from your local ag extension service....
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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And all that has what to do with the question, which was growing turf on top of a membrane?
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