lawn lime

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Best type to use on a newly seeded lawn,granular or ground,and why
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The pellets are much easier to spread since it doesn't clog the spreader as bad as the pulverized variety. They are basically the same product otherwise.
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Steveo wrote:

That's incorrect. The pelletized "lime" sold in big box stores is actually limestone (calcium carbonate). Real lime from a tile/concrete place is hydrated calcium oxide. The pelletized product is much easier to handle. But real lime reacts much more quickly whereas limestone is used for monuments. Acid rain certainly has caused damage to limestone things but it takes many years.
Now, if you want a really strong base order anhydrous calcium oxide from a chem supply house, but be careful with it because it sucks the water out of anything it's in contact with. I'm experimenting with a cheap compromise -- good old fashion wash lye, sodium hydroxide. It's quite basic and should be effective at raising the pH of the lawn.
Of course, JoeM should test his soil pH before doing anything. Mix together samples from a half dozen spots so an average is read.
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No, it is correct actually.
He's speaking of agricultural lime and the difference between the pelletized and pulverized variety's, in which case there is no difference besides a bonding agent to hold the pellets together.
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Steveo wrote:

I agree. The lime products associated with cement are not found at garden shops. What you buy at the garden shop is suitable for lawns, regardless of the form. And I agree that the pelitized form is much easier and less messy to apply, though more expensive.
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trader4 wrote:

ok, now that ya'll got the lime all identified, I'll share a lawn care tip. it's been noted already how pulverized lime clogs the spreader and is no fun to work with. but pulverized lime will go into the soil faster than pelletized. you need to speed up the obtaining of the desired result from your lime application. [impatient customer] mix 60/40 pelletized/pulverized in the spreader hopper. MIX well with stir stick and then apply. this trick has only been field tested in a broadcast type spreader, therefore at this time there is no data available for the use of one of those crappy drop type spreaders.
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Jim Ledford wrote:

I don't doubt that this could work and be a lower cost solution, but do you really think it works any faster? Doesn't the pelletized form just effectively become the pulverized after the first rain or water application?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Sure does, and I imagine one would need a fairly calm (no wind) day to apply pulverized limestone with a broadcast spreader unless you don't mind looking like casper the ghost when you're finished. :-)
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wrote:

Its not limestone!!! Lime is actually brown in colour!
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Does this look brown to you?
http://www.martinlimestone.com/mli/aglime/images/lime3.jpg
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wrote:

Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed chiefly of calcium carbonate, which in its' pure form is white. Limestone varies widely in color due to other material that accreted in the sediment. The lime associated with building is not calcium carbonate but calcium hydroxide which is quite caustic.
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Chas Hurst wrote: <...>

Calcium Oxide is caustic in its anhydrous form. When it absorbs water it goes to CaO * 6H20 or maybe CaOH as you suggest. Pardon me if I got this wrong -- it's been nearly 50 years since I was in high school chemistry class!
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trader4 wrote:

field test data has shown a faster rate of change in the soil pH when pulverized lime was applied at the same rate as pelletized lime on two separate plots controlled and held to the same conditions.
mixing in the prescribed 60/40 pelletized/pulverized manner offers a better way to work with pulverized lime in order to gain a faster change in the pH.
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How much faster, do you have a url to these test results?
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Steveo wrote:

under the heading "Selecting a Liming Material" you'll see and read.
"The finer the limestone particles, the more rapidly it becomes effective"
"The finer the grind of the limestone the faster it will change the soil pH value."
http://www.savvygardener.com/Features/soil_ph.html
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Jim Ledford wrote:

I don't think we are disputing the fact that finer ground limestone will work faster. But isn't pelletized aboput the same grind just made into pellets with some kind of binder that dissolves quickly with water?
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Faster...5 minutes, 5 hours, 5 days?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

no.
limestone should be applied two to three months prior to planting to allow time for it to neutralize the acidity.
The most important factor determining the effectiveness of lime is placement. Maximum contact of lime with the soil is essential.
Most liming materials are only slightly soluble in water,
so incorporation in the soil is a must for lime reaction. Even when properly mixed with the soil, lime will have little effect on pH if the soil is dry.
Moisture is essential for the lime-soil reaction to occur.
In the case of lawns, it can only be surface applied and watered into the soil.
what the author is attempting to convey is, that it is not how fast the water dissolves the lime but it is more about a reaction occurring in the soil when lime becomes properly mixed with the soil.
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JoeM wrote:

what about when to use? I have soil test results for my front and back yard. I am supposed to apply lime and fertilizer to the back, fertilizer only to the front. I will be seeding new fescue (establishing, not overseeding) both yards this mid september. I plan to mix the lime pretty well into the top 6" of the soil and the fertilizer as well. Is this right? Do i do this way before or right before i plant the seeds? or should i fertilize after i plant and have mowed a few times? i have read both and am looking for some opinions.
thanks for any help! jerry
ps. i'm in central NC
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

takes lime 3 to 4 months to break down and even begin to change the pH of the soil.

this places you far far ahead of most people. my compliments for your having tested to determine the requirements of your soil rather than just tossing a bag of this, that, these and those while thinking "yep, that ought to do it."

lime now. if the recommendation was for 400 pounds of lime then break that into 4 100 pound applications spaced by a week and a half. doing this reduces the abruptness of the lime coming due and makes for a softer transition.
fertilize after planting and best to wait until grass is about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch tall. then apply your fertilizer.
here's a cheap trick for making a NEW lawn jump to life in the first weeks after the new grass sprouts. get the miracle grow feeder jar and hook it in line with your garden hose lawn sprinkler. fill miracle grow feeder jar with miracle grow bloom buster 10-50-10. The second number in a fertilizer formula is the phosphorus content. Phosphorus is used by plants to increase fruit development and to produce a strong root system. get the root system established first. build a good foundation first. a house built on a weak foundation will not last and the same is true of your lawn. hook the miracle grow feeder jar to your lawn sprinkler. when the water is clear in the miracle grow feeder jar then that's enough for that spot. refill miracle grow feeder jar, relocate and repeat until complete coverage of your lawn has been accomplished. do this once a week for 3 weeks.
granular starter fertilizers have a high middle number but ALL of them have to much nitrogen. Nitrogen is used by plants for producing leaf growth and greener, lusher leaves. the problem results when the grass blade growth exceeds what the roots can feed. like the house built on a poor foundation, it looks nice for awhile but then it falls down.
3-9-9 is the mix I use for the first several granular fertilizer applications on new lawns.

if you can drive to Wendell I'll give you a phone number for a Farm supply house where you can purchase good quality fertilizers at great prices. they carry a 3-9-9 with all sub-elements. great stuff for young lawns.
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