lawn

I am starting a portion of my lawn over again. I have loosened up the soil, fertilized, and seeded. I now have placed hay all over. Is is necessary to continue to water when using hay? (so far no results!)
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water, water, water

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SCR wrote:

A newly-seeded lawn shouldn't be "watered" (an inch a week) -- it should be constantly moist. The first couple of weeks after seeding, you should sprinkle it at *least* daily, preferably more. If the dirt looks dry, it's too dry. If the dirt doesn't look dry, check with a knife; it might still be too dry (crumbly).
When you see seedlings, you can back off gradually.
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SCR wrote:

Sprinkle lightly every day. The top 1/8" (about 2 mm) of soil must remain moist. This means you can't put down 1/2" to 1" of water once a week. It is difficult to keep that top 1/8" moist without daily water, and in hot/sunny/dry conditions, twice a day may be necessary. Once it sprouts, you can back off some.
Austin
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That grass is never going to grow. This is the WORST time to plant seed. Fall is the best time, then spring, but NEVER in the dead heat of summer. How well did you loosen up the soil? And what kind of fertilizer did you apply? You shouldn't have done that. Any kind of fertilizer with a weed killer in it such as "weed n feed" and the grass won't germinate. Grass seeds ALWAYS need to be kept moist. You must water the seed every day. I wouldn't have covered with hay, I would have covered with a product called "penn mulch" instead. What type of grass seed did you plant anyway?

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Probably wrote:

> That grass is never going to grow. > This is the WORST time to plant seed. Fall is the best time, then spring, > but NEVER in the dead heat of summer. > How well did you loosen up the soil? And what kind of fertilizer did you > apply? You shouldn't have done that. Any kind of fertilizer with a weed > killer in it such as "weed n feed" and the grass won't germinate. > Grass seeds ALWAYS need to be kept moist. You must water the seed every > day. I wouldn't have covered with hay, I would have covered with a product > called "penn mulch" instead. > What type of grass seed did you plant anyway? >
I plant grass seed in the summer all the time. As long as you keep it wet, water deeply every morning before 11:00 am for about 2 weeks, and the grass will come. I am in Iowa so I guess the local weather would be a huge factor in success or failure. Iowa versus the Arizona desert or Florida. It really is best to plant in the spring or, better yet, fall because it just needs less babysitting. And hay works fine and is cheaper than the manufactured mulch, but is harder to manage. If cost is not a factor, then the manufactured mulch is preferrable as "Probably" suggested. And, if you fert., use a plain starter fert. DO NOT use weed and feed.
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You can plant grass in summer, just like you can go to the beach in January, but neither is advisable. Summer requires a lot of water, there is intense competition from weeds, and cool season grasses like fescues and blue grass don't like to grow in high temps. In another month, it will be the optimum time to seed, so why do it now?
Watering deeply once a day is not what seed needs. The surface should be kept constantly wet, which usually means watering it several times a day lightly when temps are high, which is one reason why summer is the worst time. A quarter inch 4 times a day is what it needs, not an inch once a day. Also, hay generally has weed seeds present, so I'd avoid using it. Peat moss or weed free straw are preferable.
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Chet Hayes wrote:

You know, some people need to realize that the internet is global. Nothing wrong with going to the beach in January if you're in Australia. And nothing wrong with planting grass in summer if you're in Greenland. Neither you nor Probably know (because he didn't tell us) where the original poster is or what zone he is in (if in the US). I'm in Minnesota, and although it's not typical, the high here yesterday was 57 degrees F (14 Deg. C). That's not too hot for planting grass.
Austin
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In fact, the original poster's email address (downeast.net) suggests that he lives in upstate Maine (in the Bangor or Bar Harbor area). The average high temperature in August is about 78 in that area. That's maybe a little warmer than ideal for growing grass, but not much.
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I planted yesterday (Aug 12) because the forecast is for cool weather and I have irrigation. I plan to seed again in Sept in the areas that did not come in well.
I find that planting in the fall leads to far fewer weeds. When I plant in the spring, I get weeds everywhere.
Can anyone tell me why fewer weeds in the fall ? Is this my imagination ?
HtH
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Short answer: annual weeds don't germinate in the fall, they prefer spring.
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Which blend did you plant, Horrible?
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wrote:

and
It's Ms. Horrible, puhleeze.
Mix of Turf-type tall fescue varieties with some bluegrass in the sun and for the shade I did a mix of hard, chewing and creeping reds.
HtH
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Let's not forget that in the southern states of the US we grow different types of grass. Bermuda grows best between 90 and 100 degrees F. ...best time to plant is during the beginning of summer. ...don't do that with Northern grass types, however.
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Yes, and others need to realize they don't know much about growing grass period. Higher temperatures are just one issue with trying to grow grass in summer. Another is major competition from weeds, which greatly diminishes in fall.
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