Id this for me

Was concerned about it spreading. Apparently, has no vine properties, or major rootage. Just want to know what it is now. Interspersed with St. Augustine in some locations near the house.
http://i13.tinypic.com/63cg2df.jpg
Thanks.
Dave
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I don't know what it is but KILL IT NOW!~ It is going to produce a little prickly seed head and then all will be lost. It was all over the place in Indiana.
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Grass is hard to ID, but just off hand, it looks like Nut Grass to me. I've been pulling it out of my herb garden for years.
Sometimes there are "nuts" on the roots too, but even tho' they are supposed to be edible, I've found them to be unbearably bitter.
--
Peace, Om

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Perhaps you have the related Purple Nutsedge? (according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyperus_esculentus the taste is a key difference between yellow nutsedge and purple nutsedge).
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http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=nutsedge&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2
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And because of the underground nut, it's one of the hardest weeds to control you'll come across in your lawn.
Red
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wrote:

Seems to be what its called. Appears easy to pull up from moist soil if I can work my fingers deep enough in the St. Augustine next to it. Not a whole lot there, primarily scattered. Knock it out in 1/2 hour easy.
Went to the accompanying weblink: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/syllabi/325/lab/Weed%20Id/weed%20page.html
Had alot of Purslane in spring. I pulled it up. A little Pigweed here and there. Think all due to sandy loam that I had brought in late winter. None of these 3 are naturally occurring in my area that I've seen. Nightshade is, but is not in my yard. Live NW of Wimberley, TX. Dave
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Purslane is supposed to be highly nutritious and edible, but I've never tried it.
I pull it all out every year and every year it comes back, with NO new soil importation either! It just appears.
I'm wondering if I should just give in and use it as a food plant. ;-)
--
Peace, Om

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http://www.google.com/search?q=Purslane%20salad
I've bought seed here.
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/search.aspx?scommand=search&search=pur slane
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade

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On Sat, 01 Sep 2007 09:38:23 -0500, Omelet
<snip>

One mature plant can produce 240,000 seeds which are viable for 40 years (Weeds of the Northern US and Canada).
It thrives in drought conditions and hoeing is not an effective remedy. Almost any piece of the plant left to touch the soil will re-root. It is hard to pull the complete root of larger plants without loosening the soil first.
It is okay to eat as greens, but I don't need the whole garden covered with it...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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ROFL!!!
I totally understand. :-) I weed it as aggressively as I do the bindweed (wild morning glory).
THAT stuff would take over the entire back yard if I'd let it, and the seeds will lay fallow and come up after each rain (or watering) all year long.
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Peace, Om

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Worth a try but I doubt you'll have much success. The tops & small portion of the roots are very loosly connected to the nut. When you pull on the top it breaks away from the nut which then forms a new shoot. Nuts can be as deep as 18" so unless you've got really long fingers, you'll probably leave the nut in the ground to resprout.
Chemical control is difficult also, yellow being slightly easier than purple. Here's the recommended herbicides: Sedgehammer for both yellow and purple. Basagran or MSMA for yellow. Image for purple. (Note that roundup/glyphosate is not listed. It affects tops only but not the nut).
Ref: http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/pmg/hf6.pdf
Red
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["Followup-To:" header set to rec.gardens.]

Those three-ranked leaves are a clue it's a sedge, though I can't begin to identify it from that photo.
I've successfully killed small populations of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) by putting on a cotton glove over a nitrile glove, and then dipping finger and thumb into some glyphosate. Draw the leaves of the sedge between finger and thumb.. then move on to the next plant. Tedious, but effective.
Kay
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