How to KILL NUT GRASS

I have round uped it, Co Oped it, using 2 things the man sez it will take it right out. Bull Snot it got it 50% of the grass/stems but no full kill. How about spraying it with Diesel? Fill me it and I will dance at your next weeding or divorce which ever comes first. Dave Tenn
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
First of all, it's not a grass. It's a sedge. It's also not a broadleaf weed, so broadleaf-specific herbicides won't be effective. Cyperus esculentus and C. rotundus are both unique as sedges, because they're the only ones that produce tubers, which makes them all the more difficult to control. It's also a herbaceous perennial, so if you don't get the whole plant (including the tubers), you'll see it again next season. Most likely even more vigorous.
Toby said:

How many applications of glyphosate did you do? How far apart were the applications? Did you thoroughly irrigate 1 day before the application? Did you irrigate again, two days later?
You won't kill it with one magic application. The best herbicides for it's control, you can't purchase as a homeowner. Sucks, but that's the feds' rules.
*****
Effective herbicides on yellow and purple nutsedges are:
Pennant (metolachlor) Basagran T/O (bentazon) Image (imazaquin) Roundup (glyphosate) [1]
Pennant is a preemergent, so that's out for now, but something to think          about for next spring. ;)
Basagran T/O is a postemergent [2], and works best on yellow nutsedge.
Image is also a postemergent [3], and works best on purple nutsedge (you didn't specify which).
Roundup (glyphosate) will work well also, much to your disbelief.
*****
For any of the above applications:
1. Make sure you THOROUGHLY read the ENTIRE label on the herbicide container.
2. One day before you apply the herbicide, throughly irrigate the area to be applied. Make sure you moisten the turf to a depth of at least 6 inches. Check this with a soil probe, to be sure.
3. Treat the area with the PROPER rate of herbicide, according to the recommendations on the label. If the temp is above 85 degrees Farenheit, DON'T apply the herbicide.
4. Two days after the application, re-irrigate the areas to the same depth as before.
5. One week after the application, repeat steps 2 thru 4. You may need several applications to completely get rid of the nutsedge.
It also pulls very easily out of the ground, usually with the tubers intact, unless it's a large, well-established patch (not first-season plants). You'd be suprised how quickly an area can be cleared of nutsedge, just by pulling it out. ;)
If you can't/won't pull it, your best bet is probably using glyphosate. Just watch your over-spray. ;)
Notes:
[1]. If you can avoid buying the brand name "Roundup", do it. Look for "glyphosate", it's the active ingredient. Scotts lost their patent, and therefore their monopoly on glyphosate. The price difference is worth the extra searching.
[2]. Requires the use of a crop oil (1.0% V/V).
[3]. Requires the use of a non-ionic surfactant (0.25% V/V).
HTH
--
Eggs

-A drunk man's words are a sober man's thoughts.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eggs Zachtly wrote:

http://www.agrisupplyco.com/cgi-bin/cgiitmls?m=ThisP&pW379.000000&l=1
41% Glyphosate Concentrate (Active Ingredient)
mix 3 ounces Gly Star™ Original with each gallon of water in the mix container. then add 3 to 5 drops of Joy dish washing detergent for each gallon in the mix container. the detergent makes the Glyphosate mixture stick longer on the plant and has the effect of producing a better and more effective kill. without the use of a surfactant nut grass is near impossible to kill due to the limited surface area available on nut grass for chemical adhesion. you can spend the extra money for the Gly Star™ Plus, however, the Joy works just as well.
yes, technically defined, it was named nutsedge. but, some of us are still going to call it nut grass!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Ledford wrote:

Basagran works great for me. I use that to selectively kill it on lawns. I would also think glyphosate would be effective too, as that kill just about anything, except for genetically engineered soybeans and similar crops :)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Basagran works great for me. I use that to selectively kill it on
Were can I buy Basagran at? Is it a Co Op.. I bought 2 packets of Sledge Hammer from them and it did not do diddley poo. Must have been the other kind of Sledge? Thank all you guys for the comments
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toby wrote:

Lesco or similar agri/landscape supply house will have it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Ledford said:

=P
--
Eggs

-If you must choose between two evils, pick the one you've never tried
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also I was thinking to weed eat it all up and then spray. That way there would not be as much leafs to transfer down to root.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

application, wouldn't it?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

not if you wait till the new baby foliage starts regrowing before you hit it.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You need to buy something specifically for nut sedge. Manage is one brand. With Manage, you need a surfactant also. I have to buy Manage from a gardening store. It's not at Walmart, Target, etc. Lots of great info here http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7432.html MANAGEMENT Tubers are key to perennial nutsedges' survival. If you can limit production of the tubers, then the nutsedge will eventually be controlled. To limit tuber production, remove small nutsedge plants before they have five to six leaves; in summer this is about every 2 to 3 weeks. Up to this stage, new tubers have not yet formed. By removing as much of the plant as possible, the tuber will be forced to produce a new plant, drawing its energy reserves from tuber production to the production of new leaves. Continually removing shoots eventually depletes the energy reserves in the tuber because 60% of the reserves is used to develop the first plant and 20% for the second. However, mature tubers can resprout as many as 10 to 12 times. Even though these newer sprouts start out weaker than the previous ones, they will gradually resupply the tubers' energy reserves unless they are removed.
The best way to remove small plants is to pull them up by hand or to hand-hoe. If you hoe, be sure to dig deeply (at least 8-14 inches) to remove the whole plant. Using a tiller to destroy mature plants will only spread the infestation because it moves the tubers around in the soil. However, repeated tillings of small areas before the plants have six leaves will reduce populations. Many people mistakenly use systemic herbicides such as glyphosate to try to kill the tubers after the plant is fully grown. Unfortunately, when tubers are mature there is little translocation of the herbicide from the leaves to the tubers, thus tubers are not affected.
If nutsedge is found in small patches in turf, it may be best to dig out the patch at least 8 inches deep, refill, and then seed or sod the patch.
Biological control of nutsedge using insects and plant pathogens has been researched, but as of yet has not provided consistent control.
In addition to consistently removing small plants, nutsedge populations can be reduced by shading, drying, mulching with geotextiles, and with properly timed applications of herbicides.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.