How to get rid of yellow jacket bee's nest ??

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I live in North Florida. There is a yellow jacket bee hive in a big clump of pampass grass (sawgrass), that I can't get rid of. I have used the long-shot Black Flag sprays, using a total of (3 ) 18 oz cans at one time, but I cannot get rid of the nest. The bees come right back to it.
I used the long-shot spray method because of the danger of getting too close, but even that was risky, as I had to fight off many bees with the spray, as they were coming after me.
My wife got stung 8 times while she was working near this spot, and that is how we first learned of it...
Does anyone have any recommendations on how I can get rid of this nest ? The pampas grass is quite large, and I cannot see the actual nest, but dozens and dozens of bees continue to fly in and out of the plant, so I know it is in there somewhere.
Please help !!!
Thank you.
James
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On 9/4/2010 12:16 PM, James wrote:

attack at nite.
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Perzactly. They can't fly well at night so are less likely to get you and they'll all be home so you can get the whole colony.
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wrote:

Use long pole or 2X4 to mark opening during day;) long pole saves you from getting stung!
Go out at nite with NO LIGHTS AT ALL, take bucket with gasoline:) approach area softly, NO LIGHTS!
dump gasoline quickly in hole and leave area! No need to light gasoline, its not necessary.
they will be dead, gasoline kills them.......
a buddy did this and dug up nest area a few days later, 3 foot diameter nest in ground.
you need not do this just toss some dirt in hole, and avoid area for a few days as straglers who were away from nest at night will be hanging around
one year i sat on a ground nest to work on a dryer vent:( a couple weeks later I chipped a bunch of wood and accidently chipped poision ivy:(
That was a bad summer:(.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote the following:

I agree with this gasoline method, except I would use a pump sprayer or old spray bottle filled with a pint of gas to get the most gas into the entrance hole.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

I have an extendable sprayer pole (can goes at the end of the pole with a string down to the trigger) used for spa raying carpenter bees in my sofits. Carpenter bees don't sting but it gets the can up to them.

Yep, or if there are any lights make sure they're the opposite direction from your escape route!

EPA isn't going to like you very much.

I'm not allergic to poison ivy, but my wife sure is. Once she had a bad summer from just washing my son's clothes.
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I had the same problem with them nesting in my attic. One night, I was stung in my bed and that was my clue that something was wrong (that, and finding dead bees in all the light fixtures!).
I was able to find the outside exit hole (the bees have their own air traffic control system and circle the entry hole until they receive "clearance" (or whatever makes them know it's time to land). I am sure if you watch carefully enough, you'll be able to see where your bees are nesting.
I watched for a while to be sure that was the only hole and waited till it was just turning dark. I suited up in long sleeves, multi-layered clothing, wore a hoody and a fencing mask and sprayed a total of 5 cans of the long distance wasp and hornet killer into the access hole. That put an end to them. Since they were all tucked in for the night, very few came towards me at all. I was surprised - I could have done the job without the protective gear.
For a few days after, there were some dazed and confused bees flying around, and I found a few more in the basement, crawling on the flood, not at all well, but their hive had been polished off. I figured $20 worth of Raid was a worthwhile investment, especially since a pest control company I had called was talking in the $300-500 range with no guarantee of success. Spraying *near* the hole isn't going to cut it. You've got to get as much of the spray *into* the hive entrance as possible. I had a friend who didn't know he had an attic full of bees until honey started dripping down the walls. Yuck! That cost nearly $1000 to be professionally cleaned up.
FWIW, I got the same sized quote when the squirrel plague hit, but $90 worth of Havahart traps and a jar of Skippy peanut butter (the squirrels hate Giant chunky, I found out!) solved the problem. The Havaharts are great because they have two trap doors, and when set, the squirrels enter without much hesitation because they can see through to the outside. Only a few have been smart enough to beat it, and one was a huge male with a tail so big that it held up the back trap door, keeping in from latching properly, allowing him to back out. Also caught 2 possums, 1 raccoon and one crow during the "Squirrel Wars." One day, I would have caught the neighbor's wandering Golden Retriever if that trap had been big enough.
Despite what people say about how smart they are, I reset the trap, keeping one side closed and putting the bait deep in the trap so he would have to go all the way in. I caught him 5 minutes later. The irony was that he was standing around, waiting for me to go back inside so he could take another chance at the bait. They sure do love that Skippy!
-- Bobby G.
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Ortho Seven is a powder, if you can get it at the hole it will kill the bees. Pros you call out to exterminate use it. You can mix it with water and pour it in if you cant get the powder in, I tape a cup on a pole and pour it in the hole. Gasolene will kill the pampas grass.
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wrote:

I didn't think powdered Seven was available anymore.
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wrote:

Its at HD, I havnt heard of it being banned.
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Walmart has something with that name on the box. Knowing our EPA, it is probably confectioners sugar, though.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 5 Sep 2010 07:51:46 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I said that because one of the morning drive talkers has the county extension services representative on every Friday. Recently they were talking about "Army Worm" infestations. Apparently Seven is the only treatment for it and he said it was now only available in liquid form, which is expensive for this use.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

Would need to know for what application was referring to--if was ag application, Sevin isn't generally used at all so presume must have been for garden/turf/lawn applications.
Again, afaik, Sevin is still a non-RUP (restricted-use pesticide) easily obtained at any retail outlet.
For ag applications, it'll depend on whether they're army worms or army cutworms; they're similar name but different species and life cycles.
<http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/plantsci/pests/e830w.htm
Cutworms can be an especial a problem in winter wheat and other cereal grains...they're one of our biggest worries every spring about what level of infestations we'll see.
--
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This was for lawn use. He also said that Sevin was far too expensive for ag use.

That's not what he said. He did talk like it was a recent thing, though.

https://sites.aces.edu/group/homegrounds/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List c631ab-2d45-4e01-a3df-a3ec5f1dad14&ID0&Web9b9cf1-40b4-4bb8-9004-85a79a4b328f
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Must be so recent that Ace hasn't heard of it yet nor did a quick google return a hit about EPA and Sevin which would normally be expected to be about the most prominent topic to come up if it were a recent development...
I suppose it could be something local or a pending thing, but it surely doesn't appear to be so at the moment afaict...

https://sites.aces.edu/group/homegrounds/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List c631ab-2d45-4e01-a3df-a3ec5f1dad14&ID0&Web9b9cf1-40b4-4bb8-9004-85a79a4b328f Which lists Sevin dust, too.
--
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It does, but the guy was on the radio in the last couple of weeks (he was talking about the Armyworms Friday, but don't remember the Sevin issue being brought up) saying that it is no longer available. It apparently is a very recent thing. Current supplies are allowed to be sold.
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On Sun, 05 Sep 2010 11:02:09 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

OTOH, a web search brings up nothing relating to a ban on Sevin. Perhaps when we're out later I'll look to see if it's on the shelves.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

In addition, the new state licensed applicators' information packet I just received last month that I just looked at for to make certain says nothing regarding Sevin and there's been no mention of it in any notices or updates I've received this crop year regarding it, either. Those generally are front page as they are generic for all licensed applicators in the State, not just ag producers like me...
One would have to know precisely what product for what application in what jurisdiction the report was referring to--it could be a municipal ban for lawn use in a local area or something but I'm quite certain it's not EPA-related nor national. Or, he could just have his facts wrong or misspoke in an interview meaning to refer to another product when his statement made it sound as though it was Sevin. Or, any of a limitless other possibilities, but I'm sure it's not an EPA mandate.
--
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On 9/5/10 12:13 PM, dpb wrote:

http://www.epa.gov/EPA-PEST/2009/March/Day-18/p5695.htm
Last year, manufacturers of Sevin and other carbaryl products voluntarily requested that the EPA terminate lots of uses for the stuff. The EPA didn't say why. Maybe the manufacturers want to open up a market for something at ten times the price.
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J Burns wrote: ...

Hmmm....interesting it didn't show up in the RUP updates I get from State re: same. Perhaps their generation notices that are pretty clearly auto-generated aren't geared to find stuff that is voluntarily delisted application instead of EPA-mandated. There's a semi-annual review coming up for long; if I think of it I'll ask about it. Meanwhile, guess best stock up if can still find some on shelves for garden altho it is of no concern for lack thereof for the farm operation.
--
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