How do I get rid of moss

The upper side of my berry patch is solid moss. There is nothing planted on it now and it in a well drained area. Is there a way to get rid of it? What does so much moss indicate? Thanks . Stan
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Probably not enough sunlight.
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wrote:

That' probably true - remember that moss grows on the north side of trees. Or is it that trees grow on the south side of moss. Sorry - - - Bob-tx
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Try increasing the pH of the soil with lime (not limestone).

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Chances are you've got heavy soil (as in clay), bad drainage, poor ai
circulation, compacted soil surface, the wrong kind of grass or som combination of these attributing factors.
I doubt there is much you can do about your soil type without grea expence and aggravation, but you can help improve the other situations
Once the area has dried a little give the entire site a short, har cut. Follow this action by raking (or scarifying) in opposin directions. This opens up the surface area and lets more air in an around the remaining grass plants whilst removing some of the proble moss. Things will look messy before they get better. Next, apply some quality grass seeds. Use a fine leaved fescue an bentgrass mixture. The smaller the leaf the less sunlight required b the plants to do well (ryegrass rarely looks good in the shade for thi very reason). This will help fill in the areas left by the moss. Rak the area again if possible and then lightly roll or tread down to ge the new seeds into contact with the soil. Do not apply fertilizer as this will only encourage the exisistin grass to outgrow the new seedlings and keep the treated area cu reasonably short for the same reason (1-2 inches). During the summer you can drive a garden fork deep into the surface a regular intervals. Fill the holes created with fine riversand or jus leave them open. This will certainly help with winter drainage an surface aeration. Not exactly a one time fix I'm afraid as the area will require a repea treatmant every season to keep your grass free from moss. Good luc
-- Grassman
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Hey Stub you always promote that quick-lime. That could perhaps be the worst thing in the world for his berries.. but his moss will die?
You really should stop with your clueless advice.
--
http://NewsReader.Com /

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Stan wrote:

If it works on roofs it might work on trees. Put a strip of zinc around the tree above the moss. Moss and lichens don't like zinc.
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""booboo 0/00 :)"" ...

They aren't lichen it....
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Stan wrote:

Why get rid of it, what's wrong with moss?
--
Art

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Art said:

[...]
He's a Prima Donna. =P
geez i hate that team... =P
--

Eggs

-I started out with nothing... I still have most of it.
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Art wrote:

Nothing wrong with moss AS LONG AS it's growing on my rocks, along the stream bank or on the north side of the tree trunks. Where I live in North Georgia USA, moss on top of the soil indicates acid soil from a lack of limestone. I use dolomite limestone every other year to keep the ph neutral.
Tom J
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On Jan 24, 1:26pm, "booboo 0/00 :)"

Re: getting rid of moss: You didn't say what parts of your body are encrusted with the moss but here are a few ideas (I used to be a medic) First, prepare a boiling 50% solution of potassium hydroxide and rain water (distilled is OK if that's all you have) Four or five gallons should be sufficient as long as your case isn't chronic. If the vegetation is confined to your armpits and crotch areas (from reading your post, it sounds as if that's the complaint) a thorough shaving is the first order of business and necessary for best results. After closely shaving the pits and pubes, fill a galvanized #3 wash tub with the hot hydroxide solution and carefully sit in the tub. Don't be discouraged if you feel some minor irritation at first; "this too shall pass", as the Good Book says. Using a large handful of coarse steel wool, gently rub away the now loosened vegetation from the afflicted area. Work quickly because the steel may have a tendency to disintegrate. Now, if you can manage it, assume a kneeling position in the tub resting the elbows on the bottom to facilitate scrubbing the armpit areas. A word of caution here:: DON"T get any of this healing solution in your mouth. It has produced an allergic reaction in some folks. If you get some in the eyes, the solution is easily neutralized with a quick eyewash of fuming nitric acid. A shotglass full per eye should do the trick. If you are a Cyclops, use two glasses in the eye.
If any of this is unclear, please write again and good luck. Moss afflictions can be a real heartache.
Benjamin Spock (Consultant to the stars)
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