Here's on for the experts

Here's one for the experts. I've been in the industry for 10 years and I've never seen this!!
In Southwestern Ontario we are seeing alot of snowmold, which I know to be more of a cosmetic problem than anything. A few of my clients properties that were completely reseeded with perennial ryegrass 2 seasons ago have lost over 50% of their lawn due to snowmold. I cannot find any bugs or any signs of any other fungus or problems. These lawns were gorgeous in the fall. Adjoining neighbours with Kentucky Bluegrass are not having this problem. Its a nice crisp line down the middle.
These clients are going to be angry if they have to pay to reseed again and its gonna cost me a small fortune if I do it for free ( highly unlikely ). Anybody know if there's a quick remedy to this - Kelp, urea application - ANYTHING.
Much appreciated
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I've
and
As you say snowmold is normally just a cosmetic problem. I'm in the Toronto area and the lawns here haven't started up yet. I can appreciate the fact that the ryegrass lawns are suffering more than the bluegrass, but how do you know that they have lost 50% of the lawns? Are you sure that they won't just come back at the bluegrass lawns do?
Peter H
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Sorry, they appear to have lost over 50% of the lawn, but they just dont look like they are going to recover from this, guess Ill have to wait it out and see what happens.

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On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 22:23:03 -0400, jamogod wrote:

Good day Jamogod. Snow mold happens here where I'm at also... but it's generally due to over-fertilization in the fall. When you say "These lawns were gorgeous in the fall...", this implies to me that the lawn was pumped with nitorgen through out the year to get that 'show lawn' look.
Before you go and treat this issue, you need to confirm what you have. There are two types of 'snow mold' out there. Fusarium patch (Pink snow mold) and Typhula blight (Gray snow mold).
http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense/scripts/query/displayProblem.asp?tableName=plant&problemIDf9&categoryID=4
<Begin copy and paste> Typhula blight (Gray snow mold) Biology Typhula blight is a fungal disease which can occur beneath snow cover on unfrozen soil. Under snow, light yellow to gray circular areas develop. These range in size up to a foot or more in diameter. Grass leaves are matted together and may be covered with a fluffy, grayish to white fungal growth, particularly near the margin of the patch. Small dark fungal structures often speckle the white mats. In cool, moist conditions such as under wet leaves, the disease usually appears as circular, yellow or brownish areas 3"-6" across. Typically only the leaves are killed by Typhula blight, but occasionally roots and crowns are also killed. Excessive thatch, high late fall fertility, and poor drainage contribute to disease development. Typhula blight often occurs in conjunction with Fusarium patch (see also Fusarium patch (Pink snow mold), TG-d11).
http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense/scripts/query/displayProblem.asp?tableName=plant&problemIDe8&categoryID=4 Fusarium patch (Pink snow mold) Biology Fusarium patch is a fungal disease common in western Washington. It is typically most severe on bentgrass and annual bluegrass at low mowing heights in shaded areas. Fescues, Kentucky bluegrass, and perennial ryegrasses may also be infected. The disease develops most rapidly during periods of cool, wet weather in spring and fall. Symptoms include small, watersoaked patches which may be 2" in diameter initially, then enlarge to 6" or more. Reddish-brown margins often surround the spots, which become tan or light gray. White to pinkish fungal growth may be present on the advancing edges. Patches may appear ring-like if grasses regrow in the center. Symptoms are most noticeable on short grasses (1/4") and less noticeable on longer grasses (1" or more). The fungus survives in the soil and on diseased grass and debris. In areas with snow cover, the fungus can grow beneath the snow as the snow melts. <End copy and paste>
In the furture you will want to change some of your maintenance practices when it comes to these lawns. Lower nitrogen applications in the fall and bagging the clippings would be a good start. Also another word of caution, save these lawns for the end of your day to mow. You will want to wash your mowers before mowing any other lawns. You can infect other clients' lawns if you do not take care.
I would mow these lawns, apply the fungicide and wait. Things 'should' balance out by the end of spring. You may need to over seed the worst areas, but it should come back.
Good luck.
--
Yard Works Gardening Co.
http://www.ywgc.com
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-snip-
Too much rye-grass.
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